NORMATIVE PERSONALITY FACTORS RECOVERED FROM RATINGS OF PERSONALITY DESCRIPTORS: THE BEHOLDER'S EYE

NORMATIVE PERSONALITY FACTORS RECOVERED FROM RATINGS OF PERSONALITY DESCRIPTORS: THE BEHOLDER'S EYE MILTON D. HAKELl Organizational Research Senrice and Department of Psychology The Ohio State University INTERPERSONAL behavior is partly dependent 011 expectations about what others will do. Onc. frequently lacks detailed knowledge of people with wliom one interacts, and as a consequence one must use a set of learned associations about traits, attributes, and IIChaviors in order to be able to anticipate what others arc likely to do, or t o make decisions ahout them. These sets of learned associations can be conceptualized as a system of inferential rclationships among personality and behavioral descriptors. These systems of descriptor interrelations have been called “implicit personality theories” by Bruner and Tagiuri (1954) and Cronbach (1955) (although Wiggins, 1973, rejects this designation), have been included in what Kelly (1955) calls “personal constructs” and are relatable to stercotyping. Schneider (1973) presents a current rcview of rcscarch 011 “implicit personality theories.” A considerable hotly of research suggests that attributions nxiy be influenced as much or more by the rater’s characteristics than by the ratee’s characteristics. Beauty, as coininon wisdom assures us, is in the eye of the beholder. This investigation secks other attributions t h a t might be in the beholder’s eye. Working http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Psychology Wiley

NORMATIVE PERSONALITY FACTORS RECOVERED FROM RATINGS OF PERSONALITY DESCRIPTORS: THE BEHOLDER'S EYE

Personnel Psychology, Volume 27 (3) – Sep 1, 1974

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1974 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0031-5826
eISSN
1744-6570
DOI
10.1111/j.1744-6570.1974.tb01164.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

MILTON D. HAKELl Organizational Research Senrice and Department of Psychology The Ohio State University INTERPERSONAL behavior is partly dependent 011 expectations about what others will do. Onc. frequently lacks detailed knowledge of people with wliom one interacts, and as a consequence one must use a set of learned associations about traits, attributes, and IIChaviors in order to be able to anticipate what others arc likely to do, or t o make decisions ahout them. These sets of learned associations can be conceptualized as a system of inferential rclationships among personality and behavioral descriptors. These systems of descriptor interrelations have been called “implicit personality theories” by Bruner and Tagiuri (1954) and Cronbach (1955) (although Wiggins, 1973, rejects this designation), have been included in what Kelly (1955) calls “personal constructs” and are relatable to stercotyping. Schneider (1973) presents a current rcview of rcscarch 011 “implicit personality theories.” A considerable hotly of research suggests that attributions nxiy be influenced as much or more by the rater’s characteristics than by the ratee’s characteristics. Beauty, as coininon wisdom assures us, is in the eye of the beholder. This investigation secks other attributions t h a t might be in the beholder’s eye. Working

Journal

Personnel PsychologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1974

References

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