Nonapoptotic functions of Fas/CD95 in the immune response

Nonapoptotic functions of Fas/CD95 in the immune response CD95 (also known as Fas) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily. Its cognate ligand, CD95L, is implicated in immune homeostasis and immune surveillance. Mutations in this receptor are associated with a loss of apoptotic signaling and have been detected in an autoimmune disorder called autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) type Ia, which shares some clinical features with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In addition, deletions and mutations of CD95 have been described in many cancers, which led researchers to initially classify this receptor as a tumor suppressor. More recent data demonstrate that CD95 engagement evokes nonapoptotic signals that promote inflammation and carcinogenesis. Transmembrane CD95L (m‐CD95L) can be cleaved by metalloproteases, releasing a soluble ligand (s‐CD95L). Soluble and membrane‐bound CD95L show different stoichiometry (homotrimer versus multimer of homotrimers, respectively), which differentially affects CD95‐mediated signaling through molecular mechanisms that remain to be elucidated. This review discusses the biological roles of CD95 in light of recent experiments addressing how a death receptor can trigger both apoptotic and nonapoptotic signaling pathways. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Febs Journal Wiley

Nonapoptotic functions of Fas/CD95 in the immune response

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/nonapoptotic-functions-of-fas-cd95-in-the-immune-response-2MTbOcdod1
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Federation of European Biochemical Societies
ISSN
1742-464X
eISSN
1742-4658
D.O.I.
10.1111/febs.14292
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CD95 (also known as Fas) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily. Its cognate ligand, CD95L, is implicated in immune homeostasis and immune surveillance. Mutations in this receptor are associated with a loss of apoptotic signaling and have been detected in an autoimmune disorder called autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) type Ia, which shares some clinical features with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In addition, deletions and mutations of CD95 have been described in many cancers, which led researchers to initially classify this receptor as a tumor suppressor. More recent data demonstrate that CD95 engagement evokes nonapoptotic signals that promote inflammation and carcinogenesis. Transmembrane CD95L (m‐CD95L) can be cleaved by metalloproteases, releasing a soluble ligand (s‐CD95L). Soluble and membrane‐bound CD95L show different stoichiometry (homotrimer versus multimer of homotrimers, respectively), which differentially affects CD95‐mediated signaling through molecular mechanisms that remain to be elucidated. This review discusses the biological roles of CD95 in light of recent experiments addressing how a death receptor can trigger both apoptotic and nonapoptotic signaling pathways.

Journal

Febs JournalWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off