Non‐occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by long‐lasting nail polish kits for home use: ‘the tip of the iceberg’

Non‐occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by long‐lasting nail polish kits for home... Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) caused by acrylates and methacrylates [hereafter referred to as (meth)acrylates] in nail cosmetics was originally reported in 1956, and has since been a relatively uncommon but well‐recognized problem . The (meth)acrylic materials were originally designed to rebuild a damaged nail or to be sculpted into a nail extension beyond the edge of the natural nail. Two main types of acrylic manicure product were used for this purpose: the ‘acrylic nails’, formerly referred to as ‘porcelain nails’, and the most recent variant called ‘gel nails’. Unlike self‐curing ‘acrylic nails’, the ‘gel nails’ require a source of light to polymerize.On or around 2010, a new type of acrylic manicure product called ‘long‐lasting nail polish’ was developed, and its use quickly became widespread. This product, also known as ‘permanent’, ‘semi‐permanent’ or ‘gel nail’ polish, is applied similarly to a traditional nail varnish with a brush either directly on the consumer's nail plate or on top of acrylic or gel nails, serving as a finish. This type of product also requires a source of light to polymerize, and is presented as a more durable alternative to conventional nail polishes . When polish is applied to natural nails, it can be http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contact Dermatitis Wiley

Non‐occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by long‐lasting nail polish kits for home use: ‘the tip of the iceberg’

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0105-1873
eISSN
1600-0536
D.O.I.
10.1111/cod.12948
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) caused by acrylates and methacrylates [hereafter referred to as (meth)acrylates] in nail cosmetics was originally reported in 1956, and has since been a relatively uncommon but well‐recognized problem . The (meth)acrylic materials were originally designed to rebuild a damaged nail or to be sculpted into a nail extension beyond the edge of the natural nail. Two main types of acrylic manicure product were used for this purpose: the ‘acrylic nails’, formerly referred to as ‘porcelain nails’, and the most recent variant called ‘gel nails’. Unlike self‐curing ‘acrylic nails’, the ‘gel nails’ require a source of light to polymerize.On or around 2010, a new type of acrylic manicure product called ‘long‐lasting nail polish’ was developed, and its use quickly became widespread. This product, also known as ‘permanent’, ‘semi‐permanent’ or ‘gel nail’ polish, is applied similarly to a traditional nail varnish with a brush either directly on the consumer's nail plate or on top of acrylic or gel nails, serving as a finish. This type of product also requires a source of light to polymerize, and is presented as a more durable alternative to conventional nail polishes . When polish is applied to natural nails, it can be

Journal

Contact DermatitisWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;

References

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