No sex difference in digit ratios (2D:4D) in the traditional Yali of Papua and its meaning for the previous hypotheses on the inter‐populational variability in 2D:4D

No sex difference in digit ratios (2D:4D) in the traditional Yali of Papua and its meaning for... INTRODUCTIONThe ratio of index (2nd) to ring (4th) finger (2D:4D, digit ratio) putatively reflects the degree of the influence of sex hormones in utero and is considered sexually dimorphic in humans (Manning, Scutt, Wilson, & Lewis‐Jones, ). Adult males have on average lower 2D:4D values than female adults (e.g., Manning et al., ). Out of hundreds of studies on digit ratio, only a few indicated lack of sexual dimorphism regarding this trait (e.g., Austrians from Voracek, Pietschnig, Nader, & Stieger, ; Zulu from Manning, Henzi, Venkatramana, Martin, & Singh, ; Dutch sample from Rammsayer & Troche, ; and the Hadza hunter‐gatherers from Apicella, Tobolsky, Marlowe, & Miller, , but see Butovskaya, Burkova, Karelin, & Fink, for opposite results in the Hadza).Evidence from various populations shows strong influence of ethnicity on inter‐ and intra‐sexual differences in 2D:4D (Manning et al., ). Manning proposed that this ethnic variance in 2D:4D might be explained by a curvilinear function of latitude, with people living at intermediate latitudes having in general higher digit ratios and showing greater sex difference in 2D:4D than their counterparts at the equator and high latitudes (2002). The evidence supporting this hypothesis, however, is inconclusive (compare: Helle & Laaksonen, ; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Human Biology Wiley

No sex difference in digit ratios (2D:4D) in the traditional Yali of Papua and its meaning for the previous hypotheses on the inter‐populational variability in 2D:4D

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1042-0533
eISSN
1520-6300
D.O.I.
10.1002/ajhb.23078
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONThe ratio of index (2nd) to ring (4th) finger (2D:4D, digit ratio) putatively reflects the degree of the influence of sex hormones in utero and is considered sexually dimorphic in humans (Manning, Scutt, Wilson, & Lewis‐Jones, ). Adult males have on average lower 2D:4D values than female adults (e.g., Manning et al., ). Out of hundreds of studies on digit ratio, only a few indicated lack of sexual dimorphism regarding this trait (e.g., Austrians from Voracek, Pietschnig, Nader, & Stieger, ; Zulu from Manning, Henzi, Venkatramana, Martin, & Singh, ; Dutch sample from Rammsayer & Troche, ; and the Hadza hunter‐gatherers from Apicella, Tobolsky, Marlowe, & Miller, , but see Butovskaya, Burkova, Karelin, & Fink, for opposite results in the Hadza).Evidence from various populations shows strong influence of ethnicity on inter‐ and intra‐sexual differences in 2D:4D (Manning et al., ). Manning proposed that this ethnic variance in 2D:4D might be explained by a curvilinear function of latitude, with people living at intermediate latitudes having in general higher digit ratios and showing greater sex difference in 2D:4D than their counterparts at the equator and high latitudes (2002). The evidence supporting this hypothesis, however, is inconclusive (compare: Helle & Laaksonen, ;

Journal

American Journal of Human BiologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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