Nitrogen and phosphorus speciation and flux in a large Florida River Wetland System

Nitrogen and phosphorus speciation and flux in a large Florida River Wetland System Hydrologic measurements and analyses of various nitrogen and phosphorus species were made on the Apalachicola River system in northern Florida in 1979 and 1980. Annual outflows of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) were not substantially different from annual inflows. However, there was significant net import of ammonia and soluble reactive phosphorus and net export of some particulate and organic species. The TN: TP ratio ranged from 12 to 15, but the specific ratio of dissolved inorganic nitrogen: soluble reactive phosphorus was much higher (up to 40) and increased in a downstream direction; this contributed to a phosphorus‐limiting situation in Apalachicola estuary. Processes within the flood plain ecosystem accounted for much of the release of organic and particulate species and retention of inorganic species. This flood plain function is probably critical for maintaining a nutrient pool in the estuary which supports secondary productivity and a detrital‐based food web. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

Nitrogen and phosphorus speciation and flux in a large Florida River Wetland System

Water Resources Research, Volume 21 (5) – May 1, 1985

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
This paper is not subject to U.S.Copyright © 1985 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
DOI
10.1029/WR021i005p00724
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hydrologic measurements and analyses of various nitrogen and phosphorus species were made on the Apalachicola River system in northern Florida in 1979 and 1980. Annual outflows of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) were not substantially different from annual inflows. However, there was significant net import of ammonia and soluble reactive phosphorus and net export of some particulate and organic species. The TN: TP ratio ranged from 12 to 15, but the specific ratio of dissolved inorganic nitrogen: soluble reactive phosphorus was much higher (up to 40) and increased in a downstream direction; this contributed to a phosphorus‐limiting situation in Apalachicola estuary. Processes within the flood plain ecosystem accounted for much of the release of organic and particulate species and retention of inorganic species. This flood plain function is probably critical for maintaining a nutrient pool in the estuary which supports secondary productivity and a detrital‐based food web.

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: May 1, 1985

References

  • Riverine transport of nutrient and detritus to the Apalachicola Bay estuary, Florida
    Elder, Elder; Mattraw, Mattraw
  • The regulation of chemical budgets over the course of terrestrial ecosystem succession
    Gorham, Gorham; Vitousek, Vitousek; Reiners, Reiners
  • Uncertainties in estimating the water balance of lakes
    Winter, Winter

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