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News Women are majority enrolled in med school, STEM majorsWomen make up the majority of students enrolled in medical school for the first time ever, according to data from the Association of American Medical Colleges. Women represented 50.7 percent of new enrollees in medical schools in 2017, compared to 49.8 percent of enrollees in 2016.The number of women enrolling in medical school has increased by 9.6 percent since 2015.Read more at http://bit.ly/2je1cQz.Admissions ethics guidelines under investigationThe Department of Justice has started an investigation into the newly launched ethics code of the National Association for College Admission Counseling and whether the ethics code, which focuses on admissions practices, violates federal antitrust laws. According to Inside Higher Ed, NACAC is under investigation for allegedly making a deal to “restrain trade among colleges and universities in the recruitment of students.”NACAC's ethics code, known as the Statement of Principles of Good Practice, encourages transparent policies and rules meant to protect students. For example, the statement discourages encouraging students to reply promptly to offers of admission by offering better housing arrangements for freshmen who responded quickly.Student loan debt, default rates worse than thoughtStudent loan default rates are worse than previously thought, according to a study released by the Department of Education. The study found that cumulative debt default rates continue to rise 12 to 20 years after students start loan repayment. That means that nearly 40 percent of students who took out loans in 2004 could default by 2023.Read the full report at http://bit.ly/2mAYmGn.More students enrolled in at least one online courseThe proportion of college students enrolled in at least one online course continues to rise, according to data published by the National Center for Education Statistics. In the 2016 academic year, 31 percent of college students were enrolled in at least one distance learning course, up from 29.2 percent the year before. The total number of students enrolled exclusively in distance learning courses had also risen by more than 100,000 students from the prior year.Students enrolled at for‐profit institutions were most likely to be taking courses at least partially online, with 57.5 percent reporting taking at least one class online.Find more about enrollment trends at http://bit.ly/2B6cmNK. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Successful Registrar Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1534-7710
eISSN
1943-7560
D.O.I.
10.1002/tsr.30404
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Abstract

Women are majority enrolled in med school, STEM majorsWomen make up the majority of students enrolled in medical school for the first time ever, according to data from the Association of American Medical Colleges. Women represented 50.7 percent of new enrollees in medical schools in 2017, compared to 49.8 percent of enrollees in 2016.The number of women enrolling in medical school has increased by 9.6 percent since 2015.Read more at http://bit.ly/2je1cQz.Admissions ethics guidelines under investigationThe Department of Justice has started an investigation into the newly launched ethics code of the National Association for College Admission Counseling and whether the ethics code, which focuses on admissions practices, violates federal antitrust laws. According to Inside Higher Ed, NACAC is under investigation for allegedly making a deal to “restrain trade among colleges and universities in the recruitment of students.”NACAC's ethics code, known as the Statement of Principles of Good Practice, encourages transparent policies and rules meant to protect students. For example, the statement discourages encouraging students to reply promptly to offers of admission by offering better housing arrangements for freshmen who responded quickly.Student loan debt, default rates worse than thoughtStudent loan default rates are worse than previously thought, according to a study released by the Department of Education. The study found that cumulative debt default rates continue to rise 12 to 20 years after students start loan repayment. That means that nearly 40 percent of students who took out loans in 2004 could default by 2023.Read the full report at http://bit.ly/2mAYmGn.More students enrolled in at least one online courseThe proportion of college students enrolled in at least one online course continues to rise, according to data published by the National Center for Education Statistics. In the 2016 academic year, 31 percent of college students were enrolled in at least one distance learning course, up from 29.2 percent the year before. The total number of students enrolled exclusively in distance learning courses had also risen by more than 100,000 students from the prior year.Students enrolled at for‐profit institutions were most likely to be taking courses at least partially online, with 57.5 percent reporting taking at least one class online.Find more about enrollment trends at http://bit.ly/2B6cmNK.

Journal

The Successful RegistrarWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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