Near‐infrared diffuse reflectance signals for monitoring spreading depolarizations and progression of the lesion in a male rat focal cerebral ischemia model

Near‐infrared diffuse reflectance signals for monitoring spreading depolarizations and... In ischemic stroke research, a better understanding of the pathophysiology and development of neuroprotection methods are crucial, for which in vivo imaging to monitor spreading depolarizations (SDs) and evolution of tissue damage is desired. Since these events are accompanied by cellular morphological changes, light‐scattering signals, which are sensitive to cellular and subcellular morphology, can be used for monitoring them. In this study, we performed transcranial imaging of near‐infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance at ∼800 nm, which sensitively reflects light‐scattering change, and examined how NIR reflectance is correlated with simultaneously measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) for a rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model. After MCAO, wavelike NIR reflectance changes indicating occurrence of SDs were generated and propagated around the ischemic core for ∼90 min, during which time NIR reflectance increased not only within the ischemic core but also in the peripheral region. The area with increased reflectance expanded with increase in the number of SD occurrences, the correlation coefficient being 0.7686 (n = 5). The area with increased reflectance had become infarcted at 24 hr after MCAO. The infarct region was found to be associated with hypoperfusion or no‐flow response to SD, but hyperemia or hypoperfusion followed by hyperemia response to SD was also observed, and the regional heterogeneity seemed to be connected with the rat cerebrovasculature and hence existence/absence of collateral flow. The results suggest that NIR reflectance signals depicted early evolution of tissue damage, which was not seen by CBF changes, and enabled lesion progression monitoring in the present stroke model. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neuroscience Research Wiley

Near‐infrared diffuse reflectance signals for monitoring spreading depolarizations and progression of the lesion in a male rat focal cerebral ischemia model

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0360-4012
eISSN
1097-4547
D.O.I.
10.1002/jnr.24201
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In ischemic stroke research, a better understanding of the pathophysiology and development of neuroprotection methods are crucial, for which in vivo imaging to monitor spreading depolarizations (SDs) and evolution of tissue damage is desired. Since these events are accompanied by cellular morphological changes, light‐scattering signals, which are sensitive to cellular and subcellular morphology, can be used for monitoring them. In this study, we performed transcranial imaging of near‐infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance at ∼800 nm, which sensitively reflects light‐scattering change, and examined how NIR reflectance is correlated with simultaneously measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) for a rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model. After MCAO, wavelike NIR reflectance changes indicating occurrence of SDs were generated and propagated around the ischemic core for ∼90 min, during which time NIR reflectance increased not only within the ischemic core but also in the peripheral region. The area with increased reflectance expanded with increase in the number of SD occurrences, the correlation coefficient being 0.7686 (n = 5). The area with increased reflectance had become infarcted at 24 hr after MCAO. The infarct region was found to be associated with hypoperfusion or no‐flow response to SD, but hyperemia or hypoperfusion followed by hyperemia response to SD was also observed, and the regional heterogeneity seemed to be connected with the rat cerebrovasculature and hence existence/absence of collateral flow. The results suggest that NIR reflectance signals depicted early evolution of tissue damage, which was not seen by CBF changes, and enabled lesion progression monitoring in the present stroke model.

Journal

Journal of Neuroscience ResearchWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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