NaOH–HCl neutralized urine preparation for direct testing of uropathogens by Bruker MS

NaOH–HCl neutralized urine preparation for direct testing of uropathogens by Bruker MS INTRODUCTIONUrine processing to improve direct identification of uropathogens using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization‐time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI‐TOF MS) could improve the quantity of extracted and purified bacterial biomass, facilitated primarily by the high bacterial counts in infected urine. Overall, currently published methods for direct identification from urine have used differential centrifugation, which combines MALDI‐TOF MS with complex extraction protocols using pre‐ or post‐treatment. Such protocols include the use of lysis solutions, such as special detergents (sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS] or tween 80) or organic solvents (formic acid or acetonitrile); filter systems, such as vacuum‐filter, dual‐filter, or diafiltration units; or short‐time bacterial cultivation on solid media. To date, the accuracy of these methods compared with conventional culture techniques has ranged from 58% to 92%. Moreover, these complex protocols require large volumes (≥10‐15 mL) and special equipment and are technically complex, labor intensive, and expensive for routine use in clinical practice.Other drawbacks of these techniques are that insufficient bacteria are usually obtained from urine samples and that they require different thresholds for identifying microorganisms depending on the species. In addition, urine culture is the gold standard for microbiological confirmation of UTIs, but up to 80% of urine culture samples have http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Laboratory Analysis Wiley

NaOH–HCl neutralized urine preparation for direct testing of uropathogens by Bruker MS

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0887-8013
eISSN
1098-2825
D.O.I.
10.1002/jcla.22280
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONUrine processing to improve direct identification of uropathogens using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization‐time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI‐TOF MS) could improve the quantity of extracted and purified bacterial biomass, facilitated primarily by the high bacterial counts in infected urine. Overall, currently published methods for direct identification from urine have used differential centrifugation, which combines MALDI‐TOF MS with complex extraction protocols using pre‐ or post‐treatment. Such protocols include the use of lysis solutions, such as special detergents (sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS] or tween 80) or organic solvents (formic acid or acetonitrile); filter systems, such as vacuum‐filter, dual‐filter, or diafiltration units; or short‐time bacterial cultivation on solid media. To date, the accuracy of these methods compared with conventional culture techniques has ranged from 58% to 92%. Moreover, these complex protocols require large volumes (≥10‐15 mL) and special equipment and are technically complex, labor intensive, and expensive for routine use in clinical practice.Other drawbacks of these techniques are that insufficient bacteria are usually obtained from urine samples and that they require different thresholds for identifying microorganisms depending on the species. In addition, urine culture is the gold standard for microbiological confirmation of UTIs, but up to 80% of urine culture samples have

Journal

Journal of Clinical Laboratory AnalysisWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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