Mutagenicity of soluble and insoluble nickel compounds at the gpt locus in G12 chinese hamster cells

Mutagenicity of soluble and insoluble nickel compounds at the gpt locus in G12 chinese hamster cells Nickel is an established human and animal carcinogen, but efforts to demonstrate its mutagenicity in a number of cell types have not been successful. In this report we describe the mutational response to nickel compounds in the G12 cell line, an hprt deficient V79 cell line containing a single copy of the E. coli gpt gene. This cell line has a low spontaneous background, making it suitable for assessment of mutagenic responses to environmental contaminants. When G12 cells were treated with insoluble particles of crystalline nickel sulfide < 5 μm in diameter, a strong, dose‐dependent mutagenic response was observed up to 80 times the spontaneous background. Of 48 mutant gpt(−) clones isolated that were induced by insoluble nickel, all were capable of DNA amplification of the gpt sequences by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The ability to produce full‐length PCR products is an indication that large deletions of gene sequences have not occurred. When G12 cells were treated with soluble nickel sulfate, the mutational response was not significantly increased over the spontaneous background. This difference in mutagenic response reflects a large difference in the mutagenic potential of soluble and insoluble nickel compounds, which reflects the carcinogenic potential of these forms of nickel. © 1993 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis Wiley

Mutagenicity of soluble and insoluble nickel compounds at the gpt locus in G12 chinese hamster cells

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 Wiley‐Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0893-6692
eISSN
1098-2280
DOI
10.1002/em.2850210408
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nickel is an established human and animal carcinogen, but efforts to demonstrate its mutagenicity in a number of cell types have not been successful. In this report we describe the mutational response to nickel compounds in the G12 cell line, an hprt deficient V79 cell line containing a single copy of the E. coli gpt gene. This cell line has a low spontaneous background, making it suitable for assessment of mutagenic responses to environmental contaminants. When G12 cells were treated with insoluble particles of crystalline nickel sulfide < 5 μm in diameter, a strong, dose‐dependent mutagenic response was observed up to 80 times the spontaneous background. Of 48 mutant gpt(−) clones isolated that were induced by insoluble nickel, all were capable of DNA amplification of the gpt sequences by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The ability to produce full‐length PCR products is an indication that large deletions of gene sequences have not occurred. When G12 cells were treated with soluble nickel sulfate, the mutational response was not significantly increased over the spontaneous background. This difference in mutagenic response reflects a large difference in the mutagenic potential of soluble and insoluble nickel compounds, which reflects the carcinogenic potential of these forms of nickel. © 1993 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Journal

Environmental and Molecular MutagenesisWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1993

References

  • Transgenic Chinese hamster V79 cell lines which exhibit variable levels of gpt mutagenesis
    Klein, Klein; Rossman, Rossman

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