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Music and Bodily Claustrophobia: A Psychoanalytic Note on Beethoven's Fidelio

Music and Bodily Claustrophobia: A Psychoanalytic Note on Beethoven's Fidelio Freud held that creative writers – and this might be extended to artists generally – could arrive intuitively at the same knowledge that psychoanalysis acquires through a laborious empirical process (Freud, ). Of all the arts, music, by its nature, is the one that lends itself most particularly to evoking the most profound aspects of a human being: indeed Schopenhauer claimed, with good reason, that it allowed one to apprehend the nature of the world without the mediation of representations. I have, in the past (Lombardi, ), explored the clinical implications of the analyst's musical associations as a part of the more general function of psycho‐sensory reverie, whose roots reach into the unconscious and the pre‐verbal dimension: the presence of music in the analyst's mind collects the scattered sense impressions of the session, arranging them in an organized spatio‐temporal flow, thus facilitating the emerging temporal organization of the analysand's mind. The development of an awareness of time fosters the development of one's own spatio‐temporality, which is rooted in the body: in this way the subject organizes the sensory matrices of his/her own identity and is less subject to the pressures of imitative dynamics. In connection with my interest http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies Wiley

Music and Bodily Claustrophobia: A Psychoanalytic Note on Beethoven's Fidelio

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1742-3341
eISSN
1556-9187
DOI
10.1002/aps.1353
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Freud held that creative writers – and this might be extended to artists generally – could arrive intuitively at the same knowledge that psychoanalysis acquires through a laborious empirical process (Freud, ). Of all the arts, music, by its nature, is the one that lends itself most particularly to evoking the most profound aspects of a human being: indeed Schopenhauer claimed, with good reason, that it allowed one to apprehend the nature of the world without the mediation of representations. I have, in the past (Lombardi, ), explored the clinical implications of the analyst's musical associations as a part of the more general function of psycho‐sensory reverie, whose roots reach into the unconscious and the pre‐verbal dimension: the presence of music in the analyst's mind collects the scattered sense impressions of the session, arranging them in an organized spatio‐temporal flow, thus facilitating the emerging temporal organization of the analysand's mind. The development of an awareness of time fosters the development of one's own spatio‐temporality, which is rooted in the body: in this way the subject organizes the sensory matrices of his/her own identity and is less subject to the pressures of imitative dynamics. In connection with my interest

Journal

International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic StudiesWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2013

References