Msx1‐2 immunolocalization in the regenerating tail of a lizard but not in the scarring limb suggests its involvement in the process of regeneration

Msx1‐2 immunolocalization in the regenerating tail of a lizard but not in the scarring limb... The immunolocalization of the muscle segmental homoeobox protein Msx1‐2 of 27–34 kDa in the regenerating tail blastema of a lizard shows prevalent localization in the apical ependyma of the regenerating spinal cord and less intense labelling in the wound epidermis, in the apical epidermal peg (AEP), and in the regenerating segmental muscles. The AEP is a micro‐region of the regenerating epidermis located at the tail tip of the blastema, likely corresponding to the AEC of the amphibian blastema. No immunolabelling is present in the wound epidermis and scarring blastema of the limb at 18–21 days of regeneration, except for sparse repairing muscles. The presence of a proximal–distal gradient of Msx1‐2 protein, generated from the apical ependyma, is suggested by the intensity of immunolabelling. The AEP and the ependyma are believed to induce and maintain tail regeneration, and this study suggests that Msx1‐2 proteins are components of the signalling system that maintains active growth of the tail blastema. The lack of activation and production of Msx1‐2 protein in the limb are likely due to the intense inflammatory reaction following amputation. This study confirms that, like during regeneration in fishes and amphibians, also the blastema of lizards utilizes common signalling pathways for maintaining regeneration. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acta Zoologica Wiley

Msx1‐2 immunolocalization in the regenerating tail of a lizard but not in the scarring limb suggests its involvement in the process of regeneration

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
ISSN
0001-7272
eISSN
1463-6395
D.O.I.
10.1111/azo.12198
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The immunolocalization of the muscle segmental homoeobox protein Msx1‐2 of 27–34 kDa in the regenerating tail blastema of a lizard shows prevalent localization in the apical ependyma of the regenerating spinal cord and less intense labelling in the wound epidermis, in the apical epidermal peg (AEP), and in the regenerating segmental muscles. The AEP is a micro‐region of the regenerating epidermis located at the tail tip of the blastema, likely corresponding to the AEC of the amphibian blastema. No immunolabelling is present in the wound epidermis and scarring blastema of the limb at 18–21 days of regeneration, except for sparse repairing muscles. The presence of a proximal–distal gradient of Msx1‐2 protein, generated from the apical ependyma, is suggested by the intensity of immunolabelling. The AEP and the ependyma are believed to induce and maintain tail regeneration, and this study suggests that Msx1‐2 proteins are components of the signalling system that maintains active growth of the tail blastema. The lack of activation and production of Msx1‐2 protein in the limb are likely due to the intense inflammatory reaction following amputation. This study confirms that, like during regeneration in fishes and amphibians, also the blastema of lizards utilizes common signalling pathways for maintaining regeneration.

Journal

Acta ZoologicaWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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