Motor fluctuations in Parkinson's disease: Central pathophysiological mechanisms, Part I

Motor fluctuations in Parkinson's disease: Central pathophysiological mechanisms, Part I The duration of the antiparkinsonian action of levodopa was studied in 48 patients with various response patterns to the oral administration of the dopamine precursor. Deterioration in motor scores after abrupt cessation of a steady‐state intravenous levodopa infusion occurred at two successive rates: an initial rapid phase followed by a terminal slower phase. Efficacy half‐time Decemberreased and initial efficacy Decemberay slope increased with progression of levodopa response groups from never treated to stable responders, and then to fluctuating responders of the wearing‐off type and finally of the on‐off type. Efficacy half‐time exceeded plasma levodopa half‐life in the 2 nonfluctuating groups, approximated it in those patients with wearing‐off responses, and was significantly shorter in patients with fluctuations of the on‐off type. The half‐times for the Decemberline in antiparkinsonian efficacy and dyskinesia severity differed significantly, suggesting different pharmacological mechanisms. Motor fluctuation severity correlated best with initial efficacy Decemberay slope, and both were best predicted by parkinsonian symptom severity. The dyskinesia Decemberay rate correlated most closely with levodopa dose. These results support the view that progressive dopamine neuron degeneration reduces the brain's ability to buffer shifts in levodopa availability attending its periodic oral administration; the clinical result is wearing‐off phenomenon. The on‐off phenomenon as well as dyskinesia apparently reflects additional secondary changes related to levodopa therapy and occurring postsynaptically. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Neurology Wiley

Motor fluctuations in Parkinson's disease: Central pathophysiological mechanisms, Part I

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 American Neurological Association
ISSN
0364-5134
eISSN
1531-8249
DOI
10.1002/ana.410240303
pmid
3228270
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The duration of the antiparkinsonian action of levodopa was studied in 48 patients with various response patterns to the oral administration of the dopamine precursor. Deterioration in motor scores after abrupt cessation of a steady‐state intravenous levodopa infusion occurred at two successive rates: an initial rapid phase followed by a terminal slower phase. Efficacy half‐time Decemberreased and initial efficacy Decemberay slope increased with progression of levodopa response groups from never treated to stable responders, and then to fluctuating responders of the wearing‐off type and finally of the on‐off type. Efficacy half‐time exceeded plasma levodopa half‐life in the 2 nonfluctuating groups, approximated it in those patients with wearing‐off responses, and was significantly shorter in patients with fluctuations of the on‐off type. The half‐times for the Decemberline in antiparkinsonian efficacy and dyskinesia severity differed significantly, suggesting different pharmacological mechanisms. Motor fluctuation severity correlated best with initial efficacy Decemberay slope, and both were best predicted by parkinsonian symptom severity. The dyskinesia Decemberay rate correlated most closely with levodopa dose. These results support the view that progressive dopamine neuron degeneration reduces the brain's ability to buffer shifts in levodopa availability attending its periodic oral administration; the clinical result is wearing‐off phenomenon. The on‐off phenomenon as well as dyskinesia apparently reflects additional secondary changes related to levodopa therapy and occurring postsynaptically.

Journal

Annals of NeurologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1988

References

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