Morphological Changes Associated with pH Changes during Storage of Platelet Concentrates in First‐Generation 3‐Day Container

Morphological Changes Associated with pH Changes during Storage of Platelet Concentrates in... Abstract. The platelet injury and loss of viability that has been shown to occur with storage of platelet concentrates (PC) under conditions with increasing or falling pH were examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. After storage, samples were taken for measurement of pH value, platelet count and size distribution, release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) into plasma, and for SEM and TEM. Increased levels of LDH were observed in PC with pH above 7.3 and below 6.1. In PC with pH above 7.3 this was related to an increased number (23%) of platelets that were lysed or had a swollen disintegrated internal structure (balloons) as seen with TEM. SEM and Coulter counter studies also showed that platelet fragmentation and formation of microvesicles were prominent in PC with pH above 7.3. The electron microscopic pictures confirmed previous suggestions that platelet disc‐to‐sphere transformation and cytoplasmic swelling occur when pH falls below 6.7‐6.8 during storage. SEM studies showed that concomitant with this change, folds and bulky projections appeared on the platelet surface. In PC with pH below 6.1 the morphological change was irreversible with the appearance of more than 90% lysed and balloon platelets. In conclusion, these studies suggest that the loss of viability observed with PC with pH above 7.3 or below 6.1 after storage is related to an increased percentage of lysed and balloon platelets. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Vox Sanguinis Wiley

Morphological Changes Associated with pH Changes during Storage of Platelet Concentrates in First‐Generation 3‐Day Container

Vox Sanguinis, Volume 50 (2) – Feb 1, 1986

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/morphological-changes-associated-with-ph-changes-during-storage-of-oKzzg9DNpp
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 1986 S. Karger AG, Basel
ISSN
0042-9007
eISSN
1423-0410
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1423-0410.1986.tb04849.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. The platelet injury and loss of viability that has been shown to occur with storage of platelet concentrates (PC) under conditions with increasing or falling pH were examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. After storage, samples were taken for measurement of pH value, platelet count and size distribution, release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) into plasma, and for SEM and TEM. Increased levels of LDH were observed in PC with pH above 7.3 and below 6.1. In PC with pH above 7.3 this was related to an increased number (23%) of platelets that were lysed or had a swollen disintegrated internal structure (balloons) as seen with TEM. SEM and Coulter counter studies also showed that platelet fragmentation and formation of microvesicles were prominent in PC with pH above 7.3. The electron microscopic pictures confirmed previous suggestions that platelet disc‐to‐sphere transformation and cytoplasmic swelling occur when pH falls below 6.7‐6.8 during storage. SEM studies showed that concomitant with this change, folds and bulky projections appeared on the platelet surface. In PC with pH below 6.1 the morphological change was irreversible with the appearance of more than 90% lysed and balloon platelets. In conclusion, these studies suggest that the loss of viability observed with PC with pH above 7.3 or below 6.1 after storage is related to an increased percentage of lysed and balloon platelets.

Journal

Vox SanguinisWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1986

References

  • Effect of mode of agitation on storage of platelet concentrates in PL‐732 containers for 5 days.
    Snyder, Snyder; Koerner, Koerner; Kakaiya, Kakaiya; Moore, Moore; Kiraly, Kiraly
  • The effect of storage on platelet morphology.
    Sturk, Sturk; Burt, Burt; Hakvoort, Hakvoort; Cate, Cate; Crawford, Crawford
  • Platelet products in human plasma.
    Wolf, Wolf

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off