Morphological adaptation and inhibition of cell division during stationary phase in Caulobacter crescentus

Morphological adaptation and inhibition of cell division during stationary phase in Caulobacter... During exponential growth, each cell cycle of the α‐purple bacterium Caulobacter crescentus gives rise to two different cell types: a motile swarmer cell and a sessile stalked cell. When cultures of C. crescentus are grown for extended periods in complex (PYE) medium, cells undergo dramatic morphological changes and display increased resistance to stress. After cultures enter stationary phase, most cells are arrested at the predivisional stage. For the first 6–8 days after inoculation, the colony‐forming units (cfu) steadily decrease from 109 cfu ml−1 to a minimum of 3 × 107 cfu ml−1 after which cells gradually adopt an elongated helical morphology. For days 9–12, the cfu of the culture increase and stabilize around 2 × 108 cfu ml−1. The viable cells have an elongated helical morphology with no constrictions and an average length of 20 μm, which is 15–20 times longer than exponentially growing cells. The level of the cell division initiation protein FtsZ decreases during the first week in stationary phase and remains at a low constant level consistent with the lack of cell division. When resuspended in fresh medium, the elongated cells return to normal size and morphology within 12 h. Cells that have returned from stationary phase proceed through the same developmental changes when they are again grown for an extended period and have not acquired a heritable growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) compared with overnight cultures. We conclude that the changes observed in prolonged cultures are the result of entry into a new developmental pathway and are not due to mutation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular Microbiology Wiley

Morphological adaptation and inhibition of cell division during stationary phase in Caulobacter crescentus

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Blackwell Science Ltd, Oxford
ISSN
0950-382X
eISSN
1365-2958
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2958.1998.00959.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

During exponential growth, each cell cycle of the α‐purple bacterium Caulobacter crescentus gives rise to two different cell types: a motile swarmer cell and a sessile stalked cell. When cultures of C. crescentus are grown for extended periods in complex (PYE) medium, cells undergo dramatic morphological changes and display increased resistance to stress. After cultures enter stationary phase, most cells are arrested at the predivisional stage. For the first 6–8 days after inoculation, the colony‐forming units (cfu) steadily decrease from 109 cfu ml−1 to a minimum of 3 × 107 cfu ml−1 after which cells gradually adopt an elongated helical morphology. For days 9–12, the cfu of the culture increase and stabilize around 2 × 108 cfu ml−1. The viable cells have an elongated helical morphology with no constrictions and an average length of 20 μm, which is 15–20 times longer than exponentially growing cells. The level of the cell division initiation protein FtsZ decreases during the first week in stationary phase and remains at a low constant level consistent with the lack of cell division. When resuspended in fresh medium, the elongated cells return to normal size and morphology within 12 h. Cells that have returned from stationary phase proceed through the same developmental changes when they are again grown for an extended period and have not acquired a heritable growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) compared with overnight cultures. We conclude that the changes observed in prolonged cultures are the result of entry into a new developmental pathway and are not due to mutation.

Journal

Molecular MicrobiologyWiley

Published: Aug 1, 1998

References

  • Cell differentiation of Proteus mirabilis is initiated by glutamine, a specific chemoattractant for swarming cells
    Allison, Allison; Lai, Lai; Gygi, Gygi; Hughes, Hughes
  • The expression of asymmetry during cell differentiation
    Brun, Brun; Marczynski, Marczynski; Shapiro, Shapiro
  • Genetics of differentiation in Streptomyces
    Chater, Chater
  • Dominant C‐terminal deletions of FtsZ that affect its ability to localize in Caulobacter and its interaction with FtsA
    Din, Din; Quardokus, Quardokus; Sackett, Sackett; Brun, Brun
  • Genetics of Caulobacter crescentus
    Ely, Ely
  • How Salmonella survive against the odds
    Foster, Foster; Spector, Spector
  • Caulobacter flagellar function, but not assembly, requires FliL, a non‐Polarly localized membrane protein present in all cell types
    Jenal, Jenal; White, White; Shapiro, Shapiro
  • Control of cell density and pattern by intercellular signaling in Myxococcus development
    Kim, Kim; Kaiser, Kaiser; Kuspa, Kuspa
  • The stationary phase of the bacterial life cycle
    Kolter, Kolter; Siegele, Siegele; Tormo, Tormo
  • Identification of a central regulator of stationary‐phase gene expression in Escherichia coli
    Lange, Lange; Hengge‐Aronis, Hengge‐Aronis
  • Bacterial cell division and the Z Ring
    Lutkenhaus, Lutkenhaus; Addinall, Addinall
  • The development of cellular stalks in bacteria
    Schmidt, Schmidt; Stanier, Stanier

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