MORE ON THE WELFARE COSTS OF TRANSFERS

MORE ON THE WELFARE COSTS OF TRANSFERS that my view is not particularly controversial, at least in Kyklor. 4. See, DAVID L.SHAPIRO, Public Investment Have a Positive Rate of Return?’, Journal of Polilical ‘Can Ecommy, Vol. 8 1 (1973), March/April, pp. 401-1 3. GORDON TULLOCK we would anticipate that the effect on the economy as a whole would tend to be relatively random. If so, we would expect that the transfer effect of the outcome of this dispute on the economy as a whole would only by coincidcnce fit some idea of social policy. Basically, it would simply be a random transfer. In my original article, I talked mainly about transfers of this sort, i. e., decisions on appropriations or programs which had a fairly concrete and narrow direct effect for some limited group of people. BROWNING to ‘tax reform’ as a typical refers , as (of) most other government proexample and says, ‘The salient feature, grams which redistribute income, is that it transfers income from one group of millions of people to another group of similarly large size’. His example is ‘the degree of progressivity of the income tax structure’. He argues that ‘no voluntary contribution to lobbying’ was made on this issues. Clearly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Kyklos International Review of Social Sciences Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1974 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0023-5962
eISSN
1467-6435
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-6435.1974.tb01913.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

that my view is not particularly controversial, at least in Kyklor. 4. See, DAVID L.SHAPIRO, Public Investment Have a Positive Rate of Return?’, Journal of Polilical ‘Can Ecommy, Vol. 8 1 (1973), March/April, pp. 401-1 3. GORDON TULLOCK we would anticipate that the effect on the economy as a whole would tend to be relatively random. If so, we would expect that the transfer effect of the outcome of this dispute on the economy as a whole would only by coincidcnce fit some idea of social policy. Basically, it would simply be a random transfer. In my original article, I talked mainly about transfers of this sort, i. e., decisions on appropriations or programs which had a fairly concrete and narrow direct effect for some limited group of people. BROWNING to ‘tax reform’ as a typical refers , as (of) most other government proexample and says, ‘The salient feature, grams which redistribute income, is that it transfers income from one group of millions of people to another group of similarly large size’. His example is ‘the degree of progressivity of the income tax structure’. He argues that ‘no voluntary contribution to lobbying’ was made on this issues. Clearly

Journal

Kyklos International Review of Social SciencesWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1974

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