Monitoring changes in back fat thickness and its effect on the restoration of ovarian activity and fertility in Bos indicus cows

Monitoring changes in back fat thickness and its effect on the restoration of ovarian activity... With the objective of testing the hypothesis if animals with a stable layer of body fat (FAT) during the peripartum have a better chance of becoming pregnant after calving, fifty‐nine multiparous Brahman cows in their last trimester of pregnancy were used. Animals averaged four parturitions and were stocked at a rate of 1.25 animal units per hectare and divided into two groups depending on the time postpartum (dpp) that the intravaginal releasing device CIDR was inserted; Group 1 (<30 dpp; n = 30) received the implant at 25.2 ± 4.21 and withdrawn 9 days later. Group 2 (≥30 dpp; n = 29) received the CIDR at 38.41 ± 5.8. Animals were AI at detected oestrus until 170 dpp and calculated as pregnant at first service or requiring more than one service (1s and >1s), not pregnant but cycling (not pregnant) and those not cycling at all (anestrus). The FAT measurements were taken twice each month from the last trimester of gestation until 96 dpp. The onset of ovarian activity was monitored through blood levels of progesterone (P4) at days 14 and 9 prior to CIDR insertion and days 10, 13, 30 and 33 after CIDR withdrawal. Animals pregnant did not have any major changes in their fat thickness. In contrast, cows pregnant in the group ≥30 dpp had changes in their FAT homoeostasis, and pregnant animals in the 1s and >1s groups did not show differences in dorsal back fat in the last trimester of pregnancy and early postpartum. In contrast, animals not pregnant and in anestrus FAT values decreased considerably after parturition. Overall, fertility was 49%, but 18% of all the animals remained anestrus losing FAT. Thus, animals with adequate metabolic conditions will have a better chance of pregnancy regardless of the time postpartum when the reproductive programme starts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reproduction in Domestic Animals Wiley

Monitoring changes in back fat thickness and its effect on the restoration of ovarian activity and fertility in Bos indicus cows

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/monitoring-changes-in-back-fat-thickness-and-its-effect-on-the-L0k9fZzx7r
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH
ISSN
0936-6768
eISSN
1439-0531
D.O.I.
10.1111/rda.13136
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

With the objective of testing the hypothesis if animals with a stable layer of body fat (FAT) during the peripartum have a better chance of becoming pregnant after calving, fifty‐nine multiparous Brahman cows in their last trimester of pregnancy were used. Animals averaged four parturitions and were stocked at a rate of 1.25 animal units per hectare and divided into two groups depending on the time postpartum (dpp) that the intravaginal releasing device CIDR was inserted; Group 1 (<30 dpp; n = 30) received the implant at 25.2 ± 4.21 and withdrawn 9 days later. Group 2 (≥30 dpp; n = 29) received the CIDR at 38.41 ± 5.8. Animals were AI at detected oestrus until 170 dpp and calculated as pregnant at first service or requiring more than one service (1s and >1s), not pregnant but cycling (not pregnant) and those not cycling at all (anestrus). The FAT measurements were taken twice each month from the last trimester of gestation until 96 dpp. The onset of ovarian activity was monitored through blood levels of progesterone (P4) at days 14 and 9 prior to CIDR insertion and days 10, 13, 30 and 33 after CIDR withdrawal. Animals pregnant did not have any major changes in their fat thickness. In contrast, cows pregnant in the group ≥30 dpp had changes in their FAT homoeostasis, and pregnant animals in the 1s and >1s groups did not show differences in dorsal back fat in the last trimester of pregnancy and early postpartum. In contrast, animals not pregnant and in anestrus FAT values decreased considerably after parturition. Overall, fertility was 49%, but 18% of all the animals remained anestrus losing FAT. Thus, animals with adequate metabolic conditions will have a better chance of pregnancy regardless of the time postpartum when the reproductive programme starts.

Journal

Reproduction in Domestic AnimalsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off