Molecular evidence for long‐distance dispersal in the New Zealand pteridophyte flora

Molecular evidence for long‐distance dispersal in the New Zealand pteridophyte flora Aim To examine the relative importance of long‐distance dispersal in shaping the New Zealand pteridophyte (ferns and lycophytes) flora and its relationships with other floras, with the null hypothesis that the extant New Zealand pteridophyte flora has been isolated since New Zealand’s separation from Gondwana. Location New Zealand. Methods rbcL DNA sequences were assembled for 31 New Zealand pteridophyte genera, with each genus represented by one New Zealand species and the most closely related non‐New Zealand species for which data were available. Maximum‐likelihood, maximum‐parsimony, and Bayesian analysis phylograms were constructed and used as input for r8s molecular dating, along with 23 fossil calibrations. Divergence estimates less than conservatively recent ages for New Zealand’s geological isolation, namely Ho > 30 Ma for pairs involving New Caledonian and Norfolk Island species and Ho > 55 Ma for all others, were taken as rejection of the null hypothesis. Results The null hypothesis was rejected for all pairs except, under some parameter conditions, for those involving the New Zealand species Cardiomanes reniforme, Lindsaea trichomanoides, Loxsoma cunninghamii, Lygodium articulatum, Marattia salicina, and Pteris comans. However, the Lindsaea and Pteris results probably reflect the absence in the analyses of closely related non‐New Zealand samples, while the Marattia divergence was highly contingent on which fossil calibrations were used. Main conclusions Rejection of the null hypothesis for the majority of pairs implies that the extant New Zealand lineage has undergone long‐distance dispersal either into or out of New Zealand. The notion of a long isolation since geological separation can, therefore, be dismissed for much of New Zealand’s pteridophyte flora. The analyses do not identify the direction of the long‐distance dispersal, and these New Zealand lineages could have had vicariant origins with subsequent long‐distance emigration. However, the alternative that many extant New Zealand pteridophyte lineages only arrived by long‐distance immigration after geological isolation seems likely. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Biogeography Wiley

Molecular evidence for long‐distance dispersal in the New Zealand pteridophyte flora

Journal of Biogeography, Volume 34 (12) – Dec 1, 2007

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0305-0270
eISSN
1365-2699
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2699.2007.01748.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aim To examine the relative importance of long‐distance dispersal in shaping the New Zealand pteridophyte (ferns and lycophytes) flora and its relationships with other floras, with the null hypothesis that the extant New Zealand pteridophyte flora has been isolated since New Zealand’s separation from Gondwana. Location New Zealand. Methods rbcL DNA sequences were assembled for 31 New Zealand pteridophyte genera, with each genus represented by one New Zealand species and the most closely related non‐New Zealand species for which data were available. Maximum‐likelihood, maximum‐parsimony, and Bayesian analysis phylograms were constructed and used as input for r8s molecular dating, along with 23 fossil calibrations. Divergence estimates less than conservatively recent ages for New Zealand’s geological isolation, namely Ho > 30 Ma for pairs involving New Caledonian and Norfolk Island species and Ho > 55 Ma for all others, were taken as rejection of the null hypothesis. Results The null hypothesis was rejected for all pairs except, under some parameter conditions, for those involving the New Zealand species Cardiomanes reniforme, Lindsaea trichomanoides, Loxsoma cunninghamii, Lygodium articulatum, Marattia salicina, and Pteris comans. However, the Lindsaea and Pteris results probably reflect the absence in the analyses of closely related non‐New Zealand samples, while the Marattia divergence was highly contingent on which fossil calibrations were used. Main conclusions Rejection of the null hypothesis for the majority of pairs implies that the extant New Zealand lineage has undergone long‐distance dispersal either into or out of New Zealand. The notion of a long isolation since geological separation can, therefore, be dismissed for much of New Zealand’s pteridophyte flora. The analyses do not identify the direction of the long‐distance dispersal, and these New Zealand lineages could have had vicariant origins with subsequent long‐distance emigration. However, the alternative that many extant New Zealand pteridophyte lineages only arrived by long‐distance immigration after geological isolation seems likely.

Journal

Journal of BiogeographyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2007

References

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