Modulation of lymphocyte proliferation by macrophages and macrophages loaded with arachidonic acid

Modulation of lymphocyte proliferation by macrophages and macrophages loaded with arachidonic acid Arachidonic acid (AA) is incorporated and exported by macrophages. This fatty acid is also transferred from macrophages (Mϕ) to lymphocytes (LY) in co‐culture. This observation led us to investigate the effect of macrophages pre‐loaded with AA on concanavalin A (Con A)‐stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. The experiments were performed in co‐culture. This condition reproduces the in vivo microenvironment in which the modulation of lymphocyte proliferation is dependent on the interaction with macrophages. Lymphocytes obtained from untreated rats or from intraperitoneally thioglycolate‐injected rats (THIO‐treated) were co‐cultured with macrophages from the same rats. Firstly, macrophages were co‐cultured for 48 h with Con A‐stimulated lymphocytes in different proportions: 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, 20 and 30% of 5 × 105 lymphocytes per well. At 1% proportion, macrophages caused maximum stimulation of lymphocyte proliferation; a four‐ to five‐fold increase, for cells from both thioglycolate‐treated and untreated rats, respectively, whereas at 20% it caused maximum inhibition. In addition, 1 or 20% macrophages were pre‐loaded with several AA concentrations during a period of 6 h and co‐cultured with lymphocytes. At 180 μM AA and 1% macrophages, lymphocyte proliferation was inhibited (by 25%), whereas at 20% macrophages, proliferation was increased, by 25‐ and three‐fold, respectively, for cells from untreated and THIO‐treated rats. AA added directly to the medium reduced lymphocyte proliferation, also being toxic to these cells at 100 μM. No toxic effects of AA were observed on macrophages. Additional evidence suggests that nitric oxide production is involved in the modulation of lymphocyte proliferation by AA‐pre‐loaded macrophages. These findings support the proposition that AA can directly modulate lymphocyte proliferation and the interaction between macrophages and lymphocytes. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cell Biochemistry and Function Wiley

Modulation of lymphocyte proliferation by macrophages and macrophages loaded with arachidonic acid

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/modulation-of-lymphocyte-proliferation-by-macrophages-and-macrophages-2J6Ml07uci
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
0263-6484
eISSN
1099-0844
DOI
10.1002/cbf.1249
pmid
16170829
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Arachidonic acid (AA) is incorporated and exported by macrophages. This fatty acid is also transferred from macrophages (Mϕ) to lymphocytes (LY) in co‐culture. This observation led us to investigate the effect of macrophages pre‐loaded with AA on concanavalin A (Con A)‐stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. The experiments were performed in co‐culture. This condition reproduces the in vivo microenvironment in which the modulation of lymphocyte proliferation is dependent on the interaction with macrophages. Lymphocytes obtained from untreated rats or from intraperitoneally thioglycolate‐injected rats (THIO‐treated) were co‐cultured with macrophages from the same rats. Firstly, macrophages were co‐cultured for 48 h with Con A‐stimulated lymphocytes in different proportions: 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, 20 and 30% of 5 × 105 lymphocytes per well. At 1% proportion, macrophages caused maximum stimulation of lymphocyte proliferation; a four‐ to five‐fold increase, for cells from both thioglycolate‐treated and untreated rats, respectively, whereas at 20% it caused maximum inhibition. In addition, 1 or 20% macrophages were pre‐loaded with several AA concentrations during a period of 6 h and co‐cultured with lymphocytes. At 180 μM AA and 1% macrophages, lymphocyte proliferation was inhibited (by 25%), whereas at 20% macrophages, proliferation was increased, by 25‐ and three‐fold, respectively, for cells from untreated and THIO‐treated rats. AA added directly to the medium reduced lymphocyte proliferation, also being toxic to these cells at 100 μM. No toxic effects of AA were observed on macrophages. Additional evidence suggests that nitric oxide production is involved in the modulation of lymphocyte proliferation by AA‐pre‐loaded macrophages. These findings support the proposition that AA can directly modulate lymphocyte proliferation and the interaction between macrophages and lymphocytes. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Cell Biochemistry and FunctionWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2005

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off