Modulating attentional biases of adults with autistic traits using transcranial direct current stimulation: A pilot study

Modulating attentional biases of adults with autistic traits using transcranial direct current... IntroductionWhilst neurotypical individuals tend to show pseudoneglect, an attentional bias toward stimulus features presented in the left hemifield [Jewell & McCourt, ] driven by the relatively greater lateralization of spatial attention to the right hemisphere (RH) [Siman‐Tov et al., ], this attentional bias is reduced in individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASC). Compared to controls, adults with ASC and infants with older ASC siblings show reduced eye‐gaze to the left side of centrally‐presented faces [Dundas, Best, Minshew, & Strauss, ; Dundas et al., ], whilst adults with Asperger Syndrome show reduced leftward bias on face‐identity matching [Ashwin, Wheelwright, & Baron‐Cohen, ]. Similar patterns are also found for neurotypical individuals with high levels of autistic‐like traits (High ALT) viewing non‐face stimuli [English, Maybery, & Visser, , 2017].Another aspect of attention linked to RH regions is global processing; the ability to integrate multiple independent stimuli into a coherent and meaningful whole [Hübner & Studer, ; Malinowski, Hübner, Keil, & Gruber, ; Weissman & Woldorff, ; Yamaguchi, Yamagata, & Kobayashi, ]. Here too, individuals with ASC/High ALT show a reduction in global processing relative to neurotypical peers [for meta‐analyses, see Cribb, Olaithe, Di Lorenzo, Dunlop, & Maybery, ; Van der Hallen, Evers, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Autism Research Wiley

Modulating attentional biases of adults with autistic traits using transcranial direct current stimulation: A pilot study

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1939-3792
eISSN
1939-3806
D.O.I.
10.1002/aur.1895
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionWhilst neurotypical individuals tend to show pseudoneglect, an attentional bias toward stimulus features presented in the left hemifield [Jewell & McCourt, ] driven by the relatively greater lateralization of spatial attention to the right hemisphere (RH) [Siman‐Tov et al., ], this attentional bias is reduced in individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASC). Compared to controls, adults with ASC and infants with older ASC siblings show reduced eye‐gaze to the left side of centrally‐presented faces [Dundas, Best, Minshew, & Strauss, ; Dundas et al., ], whilst adults with Asperger Syndrome show reduced leftward bias on face‐identity matching [Ashwin, Wheelwright, & Baron‐Cohen, ]. Similar patterns are also found for neurotypical individuals with high levels of autistic‐like traits (High ALT) viewing non‐face stimuli [English, Maybery, & Visser, , 2017].Another aspect of attention linked to RH regions is global processing; the ability to integrate multiple independent stimuli into a coherent and meaningful whole [Hübner & Studer, ; Malinowski, Hübner, Keil, & Gruber, ; Weissman & Woldorff, ; Yamaguchi, Yamagata, & Kobayashi, ]. Here too, individuals with ASC/High ALT show a reduction in global processing relative to neurotypical peers [for meta‐analyses, see Cribb, Olaithe, Di Lorenzo, Dunlop, & Maybery, ; Van der Hallen, Evers,

Journal

Autism ResearchWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

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