Modeling Base Flow Soil Water Residence Times From Deuterium Concentrations

Modeling Base Flow Soil Water Residence Times From Deuterium Concentrations Three approaches to determining mean soil water residence times in a steep headwater catchment were investigated. The deuterium concentrations of soil water collected from 11 suction cup samplers at the Maimai M8 catchment were determined weekly for 14 weeks and the results compared with those of rainfall in the same period. Deuterium variations in the suction samples were considerably delayed and diminished compared with the rainfall, indicating significant storage times and mixing with soil water. Soil matrix water at shallow levels (∼200 mm depth) in unsaturated soils was relatively responsive to fresh input, but deeper water and water near the stream subject to occasional water table rises showed much less variation. Steady state and non‐steady state exponential models gave similar mean residence times, ranging from 12 to more than 100 days for different locations. Three groups of soil water response were defined, comprising shallow, medium and deep (near‐stream) soil locations based on the mean residence times. The nonsteady models revealed considerable week‐to‐week and longer variations in mean residence time for shallow soil (SL4), but indicated that steady state models could adequately represent the system in the overall period investigated. In the third approach, model types and parameters that gave the best fits to the soil water deuterium concentrations were determined. Exponential and especially dispersion models were the most satisfactory. Weighting the input (rainfall δD) partially or fully with the amount of rainfall gave much worse fits than with the unweighted input, showing that much of the rainfall bypasses the soil matrix. The best fitting dispersion model (designated DM2) yielded the most accurate mean residence times: 13 days for shallow soil (SL4), 42 days for soil at 400 mm depth (SL5), both at midslope locations, and 63 days for soil at 800 mm depth near the stream (SL2). Capillary flow was important for the unsaturated shallow soil (SL4), while advection and hydrodynamic dispersion (mixing) were more dominant for the periodically saturated (SL5) and the generally saturated (SL2) soils. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

Modeling Base Flow Soil Water Residence Times From Deuterium Concentrations

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/modeling-base-flow-soil-water-residence-times-from-deuterium-s7umdtlfOX
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
D.O.I.
10.1029/91WR01569
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Three approaches to determining mean soil water residence times in a steep headwater catchment were investigated. The deuterium concentrations of soil water collected from 11 suction cup samplers at the Maimai M8 catchment were determined weekly for 14 weeks and the results compared with those of rainfall in the same period. Deuterium variations in the suction samples were considerably delayed and diminished compared with the rainfall, indicating significant storage times and mixing with soil water. Soil matrix water at shallow levels (∼200 mm depth) in unsaturated soils was relatively responsive to fresh input, but deeper water and water near the stream subject to occasional water table rises showed much less variation. Steady state and non‐steady state exponential models gave similar mean residence times, ranging from 12 to more than 100 days for different locations. Three groups of soil water response were defined, comprising shallow, medium and deep (near‐stream) soil locations based on the mean residence times. The nonsteady models revealed considerable week‐to‐week and longer variations in mean residence time for shallow soil (SL4), but indicated that steady state models could adequately represent the system in the overall period investigated. In the third approach, model types and parameters that gave the best fits to the soil water deuterium concentrations were determined. Exponential and especially dispersion models were the most satisfactory. Weighting the input (rainfall δD) partially or fully with the amount of rainfall gave much worse fits than with the unweighted input, showing that much of the rainfall bypasses the soil matrix. The best fitting dispersion model (designated DM2) yielded the most accurate mean residence times: 13 days for shallow soil (SL4), 42 days for soil at 400 mm depth (SL5), both at midslope locations, and 63 days for soil at 800 mm depth near the stream (SL2). Capillary flow was important for the unsaturated shallow soil (SL4), while advection and hydrodynamic dispersion (mixing) were more dominant for the periodically saturated (SL5) and the generally saturated (SL2) soils.

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1991

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off