Mobility advice to help prevent re‐ulceration in diabetes

Mobility advice to help prevent re‐ulceration in diabetes Clinicians and patients face a dilemma in understanding how best to resume walking after a healed diabetic neuropathic ulcer. The objectives of this brief review are to: provide context for the patient's health and mobility status; propose 5 suggestions to safely and effectively progress mobility following a healed foot ulcer; and to consider topics for future research to improve care in this area. Rates of ulcer recurrence and mortality are high, and activity is low following a diabetic foot wound. Medical and rehabilitation approaches have emphasized protection of the insensitive, fragile foot with the hope to prevent subsequent harm to the foot and person. In particular, the 1–2 months following wound unloading and “healing” have the greatest risk for ulcer recurrence. While early protection should be emphasized, a growing body of evidence suggests that over‐protection of the foot and limited walking can be harmful, presumably because of the negative effects of prolonged immobility and stress protection. Multiple recent studies report the ability of exercise and walking to have a positive effect on various diabetic foot outcomes without additional harm. Much less is known about how an ulcerated foot can resume walking after the wound is healed. This review integrates available guidelines, evidence, and precautions to suggest advice on how best to resume and progress walking in this population at high risk for ulcer recurrence. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Diabetes/Metabolism: Research and Reviews Wiley

Mobility advice to help prevent re‐ulceration in diabetes

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/mobility-advice-to-help-prevent-re-ulceration-in-diabetes-SgqpCL2Yzw
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2020 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1520-7552
eISSN
1520-7560
DOI
10.1002/dmrr.3259
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Clinicians and patients face a dilemma in understanding how best to resume walking after a healed diabetic neuropathic ulcer. The objectives of this brief review are to: provide context for the patient's health and mobility status; propose 5 suggestions to safely and effectively progress mobility following a healed foot ulcer; and to consider topics for future research to improve care in this area. Rates of ulcer recurrence and mortality are high, and activity is low following a diabetic foot wound. Medical and rehabilitation approaches have emphasized protection of the insensitive, fragile foot with the hope to prevent subsequent harm to the foot and person. In particular, the 1–2 months following wound unloading and “healing” have the greatest risk for ulcer recurrence. While early protection should be emphasized, a growing body of evidence suggests that over‐protection of the foot and limited walking can be harmful, presumably because of the negative effects of prolonged immobility and stress protection. Multiple recent studies report the ability of exercise and walking to have a positive effect on various diabetic foot outcomes without additional harm. Much less is known about how an ulcerated foot can resume walking after the wound is healed. This review integrates available guidelines, evidence, and precautions to suggest advice on how best to resume and progress walking in this population at high risk for ulcer recurrence.

Journal

Diabetes/Metabolism: Research and ReviewsWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2020

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off