Mixing English in French advertising

Mixing English in French advertising This paper focuses on the use of English in advertising, supplementing previous research on advertising with an analysis of code–mixed advertisements drawn from recent magazines in France. Strong evidence emerges that advertising language differs significantly from non–persuasive varieties in terms of the available choices of medium and function, the role of ‘participants’, and, most importantly, the innovative linguistic and paralinguistic features that serve as attention–getting devices. Furthermore, the discourse domains of English in code–mixed advertising seem to reach far beyond those normally associated with English (e.g., modernity, technology, and science). Finally, it is suggested that the proportion of English in a given advertisement may be an important factor in determining its socio–psychological effect. A cline of code–mixed advertising is introduced as a possible means of measuring this English/non–English ratio from a structural perspective. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png World Englishes Wiley

Mixing English in French advertising

World Englishes, Volume 21 (3) – Nov 1, 2002

Mixing English in French advertising


ELIZABETH MARTIN* ABSTRACT: This paper focuses on the use of English in advertising, supplementing previous research on advertising with an analysis of code-mixed advertisements drawn from recent magazines in France.1 Strong evidence emerges that advertising language differs significantly from non-persuasive varieties in terms of the available choices of medium and function, the role of `participants', and, most importantly, the innovative linguistic and paralinguistic features that serve as attention-getting devices. Furthermore, the discourse domains of English in code-mixed advertising seem to reach far beyond those normally associated with English (e.g., modernity, technology, and science). Finally, it is suggested that the proportion of English in a given advertisement may be an important factor in determining its sociopsychological effect. A cline of code-mixed advertising is introduced as a possible means of measuring this English/non-English ratio from a structural perspective. INTRODUCTION Linguistic research in the field of advertising has gained a certain popularity in recent years (Bhatia, 1987, 1992, 2000; Cook, 1992; Grunig, 1990; Larson, 1990; Takashi, 1990; Martin, 1998; among others). Those interested in language as it is used in various social contexts are applying well-rehearsed investigative techniques to print, radio and television media in an effort to determine the precise linguistic properties and socio-psychological effects of this very persuasive form of communication. Linguists wishing to embark on such an investigation, however, are well advised to familiarize themselves with the variables that are particular to advertising.2 Indeed, the characterization of advertisements for the purposes of linguistic and/or sociocultural analysis can be rather problematic due to their complexity in terms of medium, function, and both linguistic and paralinguistic elements. One can, for instance, classify ads according to (1) product category,...
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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Blackwell Publishers Ltd 2002
ISSN
0883-2919
eISSN
1467-971X
DOI
10.1111/1467-971X.00256
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper focuses on the use of English in advertising, supplementing previous research on advertising with an analysis of code–mixed advertisements drawn from recent magazines in France. Strong evidence emerges that advertising language differs significantly from non–persuasive varieties in terms of the available choices of medium and function, the role of ‘participants’, and, most importantly, the innovative linguistic and paralinguistic features that serve as attention–getting devices. Furthermore, the discourse domains of English in code–mixed advertising seem to reach far beyond those normally associated with English (e.g., modernity, technology, and science). Finally, it is suggested that the proportion of English in a given advertisement may be an important factor in determining its socio–psychological effect. A cline of code–mixed advertising is introduced as a possible means of measuring this English/non–English ratio from a structural perspective.

Journal

World EnglishesWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2002

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