Mineral features of connective dental hard tissues in hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta

Mineral features of connective dental hard tissues in hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta INTRODUCTIONAmelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders that may affect the enamel of teeth (Gadhia, McDonald, Arkutu, & Malik, ). This disorder is classified into four main groups, depending on the clinical presentation of the defects and the stage of enamel formation that is primarily affected (Aldred, Savarirayan, & Crawford, ). These groups are identified as (i) hypoplastic, (ii) hypocalcified/hypomineralized, (iii) hypomature, and (iv) hypomineralized/hypomature AI with taurodontism. For the hypoplastic type, pathological processes of mineralization, called calcinosis, are particularly described in the connective tissues of AI patients. Such calcinosis could be described in either kidneys, gingivae, or dental pulp (de la Dure‐Molla et al., ). The complex process by which precipitations of inorganic compounds within these organic matrices occur remains unclear. Besides, little is known about the structure and the mineralized compound of the dental hard tissues of mesenchymal origin such as dentin and cementum in the context of AI and particularly for the hypoplastic type.Dentin forms the largest portion of a tooth. It contains 70% carbonated apatite, 20% organic matrix mainly constituted by type I collagen, and 10% water by weight. The collagen matrix serves as a scaffold for crystal deposition, while the non‐collagenous proteins http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oral Diseases Wiley

Mineral features of connective dental hard tissues in hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley &Sons Ltd
ISSN
1354-523X
eISSN
1601-0825
D.O.I.
10.1111/odi.12724
Publisher site
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Abstract

INTRODUCTIONAmelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders that may affect the enamel of teeth (Gadhia, McDonald, Arkutu, & Malik, ). This disorder is classified into four main groups, depending on the clinical presentation of the defects and the stage of enamel formation that is primarily affected (Aldred, Savarirayan, & Crawford, ). These groups are identified as (i) hypoplastic, (ii) hypocalcified/hypomineralized, (iii) hypomature, and (iv) hypomineralized/hypomature AI with taurodontism. For the hypoplastic type, pathological processes of mineralization, called calcinosis, are particularly described in the connective tissues of AI patients. Such calcinosis could be described in either kidneys, gingivae, or dental pulp (de la Dure‐Molla et al., ). The complex process by which precipitations of inorganic compounds within these organic matrices occur remains unclear. Besides, little is known about the structure and the mineralized compound of the dental hard tissues of mesenchymal origin such as dentin and cementum in the context of AI and particularly for the hypoplastic type.Dentin forms the largest portion of a tooth. It contains 70% carbonated apatite, 20% organic matrix mainly constituted by type I collagen, and 10% water by weight. The collagen matrix serves as a scaffold for crystal deposition, while the non‐collagenous proteins

Journal

Oral DiseasesWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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