Midbrain dopaminergic cell loss in parkinson's disease: Computer visualization

Midbrain dopaminergic cell loss in parkinson's disease: Computer visualization Computer visualization techniques were used to map the distribution of dopaminergic neurons within midbrain tissue sections from 5 parkinsonian patients and 3 age‐matched control subjects. The Parkinsonian brains had over 50% fewer dopaminergic neurons within the midbrain than age‐matched normal brains. The cell loss occurred within the combined substantia nigra (dopaminergic nucleus A9) and retrorubral (dopaminergic nucleus A8) areas (> 61%) and the ventral tegmental area (dopaminergic nucleus A10) (> 42%). The cell loss was greatest within the ventral portion of the substantia nigra zona compacta. The specific pattern of cell loss is very similar to the pattern of cells that project to the striatum (as opposed to cortical and limbic sites) in animal neuroanatomical tracing experiments. These data suggest that Parkinson's disease preferentially destroys midbrain dopaminergic neurons in nuclei A8, A9, and A10, which project to the striatum. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Neurology Wiley

Midbrain dopaminergic cell loss in parkinson's disease: Computer visualization

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 American Neurological Association
ISSN
0364-5134
eISSN
1531-8249
D.O.I.
10.1002/ana.410260403
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Computer visualization techniques were used to map the distribution of dopaminergic neurons within midbrain tissue sections from 5 parkinsonian patients and 3 age‐matched control subjects. The Parkinsonian brains had over 50% fewer dopaminergic neurons within the midbrain than age‐matched normal brains. The cell loss occurred within the combined substantia nigra (dopaminergic nucleus A9) and retrorubral (dopaminergic nucleus A8) areas (> 61%) and the ventral tegmental area (dopaminergic nucleus A10) (> 42%). The cell loss was greatest within the ventral portion of the substantia nigra zona compacta. The specific pattern of cell loss is very similar to the pattern of cells that project to the striatum (as opposed to cortical and limbic sites) in animal neuroanatomical tracing experiments. These data suggest that Parkinson's disease preferentially destroys midbrain dopaminergic neurons in nuclei A8, A9, and A10, which project to the striatum.

Journal

Annals of NeurologyWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1989

References

  • Central catecholamine neuron systems: anatomy and physiology of the dopamine systems
    Moore, Moore; Bloom, Bloom
  • Neurochemical and histochemical characterization of neurotoxic effects of 1‐methyl‐4‐phenyl‐1,2,3,6‐tetrahydropyridine on brain catecholamine neurones in the mouse
    Hallman, Hallman; Lange, Lange; Olson, Olson

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