Microsatellite markers for investigating population structure in Octopus vulgaris (Mollusca: Cephalopoda)

Microsatellite markers for investigating population structure in Octopus vulgaris (Mollusca:... Octopus vulgaris , Cuvier 1787, is probably the most widely found cephalopod species, having a worldwide distribution in temperate waters on the continental shelves of Europe, Africa, Asia and the Atlantic coasts of North and South America. Whether it is a truly cosmopolitan species or a species‐complex has yet to be investigated by modern molecular methods, but it is nevertheless an important fisheries category with global catches in excess of 100 000 tonnes. Despite its fishery importance, there are currently no methods for the investigation of population structuring or the identification of ‘stocks’ for fishery management of this important species. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of the first polymorphic microsatellite markers for the study of population structure in O. vulgaris. Genomic DNA was extracted from ethanol preserved arm tips from six individual octopus specimens from Crete, and six from Vigo; these locations represent the extremes of the range of sites from where O. vulgaris samples were obtained during this project. A phenol–chloroform extraction procedure modified for use in molluscs following Vernon . (1995) was used. Two size selected partial genomic libraries ( Rassmann . 1991 ), the first 300–600 base pairs (bp) and the second http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular Ecology Wiley

Microsatellite markers for investigating population structure in Octopus vulgaris (Mollusca: Cephalopoda)

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0962-1083
eISSN
1365-294X
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1365-294x.2000.00882-7.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Octopus vulgaris , Cuvier 1787, is probably the most widely found cephalopod species, having a worldwide distribution in temperate waters on the continental shelves of Europe, Africa, Asia and the Atlantic coasts of North and South America. Whether it is a truly cosmopolitan species or a species‐complex has yet to be investigated by modern molecular methods, but it is nevertheless an important fisheries category with global catches in excess of 100 000 tonnes. Despite its fishery importance, there are currently no methods for the investigation of population structuring or the identification of ‘stocks’ for fishery management of this important species. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of the first polymorphic microsatellite markers for the study of population structure in O. vulgaris. Genomic DNA was extracted from ethanol preserved arm tips from six individual octopus specimens from Crete, and six from Vigo; these locations represent the extremes of the range of sites from where O. vulgaris samples were obtained during this project. A phenol–chloroform extraction procedure modified for use in molluscs following Vernon . (1995) was used. Two size selected partial genomic libraries ( Rassmann . 1991 ), the first 300–600 base pairs (bp) and the second

Journal

Molecular EcologyWiley

Published: May 1, 2000

References

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