Melanocytic Matricoma: A Distinctive Clinicopathologic Entity

Melanocytic Matricoma: A Distinctive Clinicopathologic Entity Carlson and colleagues in 1999 reported a unique entity composed of neoplastic matrical cells with a significant melanocytic component and termed this entity melanocytic matricoma (MM). This lesion contained large amounts of melanin, distributed in the matrical/supramatrical (shadow) cells and within macrophages. It is well known that the bulb of the anagen hair follicle contains matrical and supramatrical cells and dendritic‐pigmented melanocytes (contained in the follicular matrix) that impart color to hair. In neoplasms exhibiting follicular differentiation, such as pilomatricoma, the matrical cells are neoplastic. Pigmentation within pilomatricoma is not uncommon, and this occurs primarily due to secondary melanization of the matrical cells. This is explained by the intimate relationship of follicular epithelium and melanocytes. A thorough search of the literature yielded only five reports of MM. We report three additional cases of MM along with discussion of clinicopathologic features and differential diagnosis. Pathogenesis Melanocytes are a part of the anagen hair bulb. In the hair cycle, pigment is transferred from follicular melanocytes to keratinocytes during active hair‐shaft formation. Melanogenesis is coupled to the anagen stage confirming that production of pigmented hair is the result of a coordinated complex interaction of melanocytes, matrical keratinocytes, and mesenchymal or follicular http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dermatologic Surgery Wolters Kluwer Health

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1076-0512
eISSN
1524-4725
DOI
10.1111/j.1524-4725.2007.33184.x
pmid
17598856
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Carlson and colleagues in 1999 reported a unique entity composed of neoplastic matrical cells with a significant melanocytic component and termed this entity melanocytic matricoma (MM). This lesion contained large amounts of melanin, distributed in the matrical/supramatrical (shadow) cells and within macrophages. It is well known that the bulb of the anagen hair follicle contains matrical and supramatrical cells and dendritic‐pigmented melanocytes (contained in the follicular matrix) that impart color to hair. In neoplasms exhibiting follicular differentiation, such as pilomatricoma, the matrical cells are neoplastic. Pigmentation within pilomatricoma is not uncommon, and this occurs primarily due to secondary melanization of the matrical cells. This is explained by the intimate relationship of follicular epithelium and melanocytes. A thorough search of the literature yielded only five reports of MM. We report three additional cases of MM along with discussion of clinicopathologic features and differential diagnosis. Pathogenesis Melanocytes are a part of the anagen hair bulb. In the hair cycle, pigment is transferred from follicular melanocytes to keratinocytes during active hair‐shaft formation. Melanogenesis is coupled to the anagen stage confirming that production of pigmented hair is the result of a coordinated complex interaction of melanocytes, matrical keratinocytes, and mesenchymal or follicular

Journal

Dermatologic SurgeryWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jul 1, 2007

References

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