Meeting Suffering With Kindness: Effects of a Brief Self‐Compassion Intervention for Female College Students

Meeting Suffering With Kindness: Effects of a Brief Self‐Compassion Intervention for Female... Objective The present study investigated the effectiveness of a newly developed 3‐week self‐compassion group intervention for enhancing resilience and well‐being among female college students. Method Fifty‐two students were randomly assigned to either an intervention designed to teach skills of self‐compassion (n = 27) or an active control group intervention in which general time management skills were taught (n = 25). Both interventions comprised 3 group meetings held over 3 weeks. To measure resilience and well‐being gains, participants filled out a number of questionnaires before and after the intervention. Results Results showed that the self‐compassion intervention led to significantly greater increases in self‐compassion, mindfulness, optimism, and self‐efficacy, as well as significantly greater decreases in rumination in comparison to the active control intervention. Whereas both interventions increased life satisfaction and connectedness, no differences were found for worry and mood. Conclusion These findings suggest that a brief self‐compassion intervention has potential for improving student resilience and well‐being. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Psychology Wiley

Meeting Suffering With Kindness: Effects of a Brief Self‐Compassion Intervention for Female College Students

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley Company."
ISSN
0021-9762
eISSN
1097-4679
DOI
10.1002/jclp.22076
pmid
24691680
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective The present study investigated the effectiveness of a newly developed 3‐week self‐compassion group intervention for enhancing resilience and well‐being among female college students. Method Fifty‐two students were randomly assigned to either an intervention designed to teach skills of self‐compassion (n = 27) or an active control group intervention in which general time management skills were taught (n = 25). Both interventions comprised 3 group meetings held over 3 weeks. To measure resilience and well‐being gains, participants filled out a number of questionnaires before and after the intervention. Results Results showed that the self‐compassion intervention led to significantly greater increases in self‐compassion, mindfulness, optimism, and self‐efficacy, as well as significantly greater decreases in rumination in comparison to the active control intervention. Whereas both interventions increased life satisfaction and connectedness, no differences were found for worry and mood. Conclusion These findings suggest that a brief self‐compassion intervention has potential for improving student resilience and well‐being.

Journal

Journal of Clinical PsychologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2014

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

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