Mechanisms underlying hemispatial neglect

Mechanisms underlying hemispatial neglect If patients with left‐sided hemispatial neglect bisect lines incorrectly because hemianopia or sensory hemiinattention prevents them from seeing how far the line extends to the left, a strategy that ensures their seeing the left side of the line in their normal field should improve performance. If patients have hemispatial hypokinesia, moving the line toward the normal half of body space should improve performance. Six patients with left‐sided neglect from right hemisphere infarctions were required to identify a letter at either the right or the left end of a line before bisecting that line. The task was given with the lines placed at either the right, the center, or the left of the body midline. Performance in trials when subjects were required to look to the left before bisecting a line did not differ from when they were required to look right. Performance was significantly better when the line was placed to the right side of the body than to the left. These observations support the hypothesis that patients with hemispatial neglect have hemispatial hypokinesia. An alternative hypothesis is that these subjects had a hemispatial memory defect. Although they saw the left side of the line in their normal field, they were incapable of forming a stable trace and performed as if they did not see the left side of the line. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Neurology Wiley

Mechanisms underlying hemispatial neglect

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1979 American Neurological Association
ISSN
0364-5134
eISSN
1531-8249
DOI
10.1002/ana.410050210
pmid
426480
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

If patients with left‐sided hemispatial neglect bisect lines incorrectly because hemianopia or sensory hemiinattention prevents them from seeing how far the line extends to the left, a strategy that ensures their seeing the left side of the line in their normal field should improve performance. If patients have hemispatial hypokinesia, moving the line toward the normal half of body space should improve performance. Six patients with left‐sided neglect from right hemisphere infarctions were required to identify a letter at either the right or the left end of a line before bisecting that line. The task was given with the lines placed at either the right, the center, or the left of the body midline. Performance in trials when subjects were required to look to the left before bisecting a line did not differ from when they were required to look right. Performance was significantly better when the line was placed to the right side of the body than to the left. These observations support the hypothesis that patients with hemispatial neglect have hemispatial hypokinesia. An alternative hypothesis is that these subjects had a hemispatial memory defect. Although they saw the left side of the line in their normal field, they were incapable of forming a stable trace and performed as if they did not see the left side of the line.

Journal

Annals of NeurologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1979

References

  • Parietal lobe mechanisms for directed visual attention
    Lynch, Lynch; Mountcastle, Mountcastle; Talbot, Talbot
  • Posterior parietal association cortex of the monkey: command functions for operations with extrapersonal space
    Mountcastle, Mountcastle; Lynch, Lynch; Georgopoulos, Georgopoulos
  • Nonsensory neglect
    Watson, Watson; Miller, Miller; Heilman, Heilman

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