Mechanisms independent of abscisic acid (ABA) or proline feedback have a predominant role in transcriptional regulation of proline metabolism during low water potential and stress recovery

Mechanisms independent of abscisic acid (ABA) or proline feedback have a predominant role in... ABSTRACT Proline accumulation in response to abiotic stress is controlled partially by transcriptional regulation of key enzymes including Δ1‐pyrroline‐carboxylate synthetase1 (P5CS1), proline dehydrogenase (ProDH), ornithine amino transferase (OAT) and Δ1‐pyrroline‐carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH). For these genes, the role of abscisic acid (ABA), role of feedback regulation by high proline and the mechanisms of gene regulation upon stress release remain unclear. An ABA‐deficient (aba2‐1) mutant, mutants deficient in proline accumulation (p5cs1), as well as double mutants deficient in both, were used to determine the importance of these factors in transcriptional regulation of proline metabolism. Upregulation of P5CS1 by low water potential was less dependent on ABA than that of stress‐marker genes used for comparison. ProDH downregulation by low water potential and upregulation by stress release was not impaired in aba2‐1, p5cs1 or p5cs1/aba2‐1 compared with wild type despite differing ABA and proline levels in these mutants. Thus, ProDH is a model for characterization of novel regulatory mechanisms associated with low water potential and stress recovery. Both OAT and P5CDH were upregulated during low water potential. This contrasts with previous salt stress experiments and raises questions about the flux of metabolites through proline metabolism under low water potential when high levels of proline accumulate. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Cell & Environment Wiley

Mechanisms independent of abscisic acid (ABA) or proline feedback have a predominant role in transcriptional regulation of proline metabolism during low water potential and stress recovery

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ISSN
0140-7791
eISSN
1365-3040
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1365-3040.2010.02188.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT Proline accumulation in response to abiotic stress is controlled partially by transcriptional regulation of key enzymes including Δ1‐pyrroline‐carboxylate synthetase1 (P5CS1), proline dehydrogenase (ProDH), ornithine amino transferase (OAT) and Δ1‐pyrroline‐carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH). For these genes, the role of abscisic acid (ABA), role of feedback regulation by high proline and the mechanisms of gene regulation upon stress release remain unclear. An ABA‐deficient (aba2‐1) mutant, mutants deficient in proline accumulation (p5cs1), as well as double mutants deficient in both, were used to determine the importance of these factors in transcriptional regulation of proline metabolism. Upregulation of P5CS1 by low water potential was less dependent on ABA than that of stress‐marker genes used for comparison. ProDH downregulation by low water potential and upregulation by stress release was not impaired in aba2‐1, p5cs1 or p5cs1/aba2‐1 compared with wild type despite differing ABA and proline levels in these mutants. Thus, ProDH is a model for characterization of novel regulatory mechanisms associated with low water potential and stress recovery. Both OAT and P5CDH were upregulated during low water potential. This contrasts with previous salt stress experiments and raises questions about the flux of metabolites through proline metabolism under low water potential when high levels of proline accumulate.

Journal

Plant Cell & EnvironmentWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2010

References

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