Measurements in vivo of parameters of the dopamine system

Measurements in vivo of parameters of the dopamine system An in vivo study of the binding of the neuroleptic drugs spiroperidol and bromospiroperidol has indicated a large amount of specific binding to the dopamine‐rich caudate nuclei of the murine brain. We have tested the applicability of the simple thermodynamic equilibrium equation to describe this binding and find that it seems to be a reasonable description of the process. It appears that a period of several hours is needed for reaching equilibrium, but after that time the behavior appears slowly to follow the equilibrium isotherm. One consequence of this model is the apparent competition of endogenous dopamine for the binding sites in vivo. The data can only be fitted by the calculations when the endogenous dopamine is included as a competitive ligand. This competition presents the interesting possibility of measuring the synaptic dopamine concentration by its effect on the binding of neuroleptic drugs. A second observation in these studies was the increase of nonspecific binding of bromospiroperidol at very low drug loadings. This increase is attributed to the presence of binding sites that are ubiquitously dispersed and very dilute but of high affinity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Neurology Wiley

Measurements in vivo of parameters of the dopamine system

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/measurements-in-vivo-of-parameters-of-the-dopamine-system-0hWTtEm3a0
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 American Neurological Association
ISSN
0364-5134
eISSN
1531-8249
D.O.I.
10.1002/ana.410150713
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

An in vivo study of the binding of the neuroleptic drugs spiroperidol and bromospiroperidol has indicated a large amount of specific binding to the dopamine‐rich caudate nuclei of the murine brain. We have tested the applicability of the simple thermodynamic equilibrium equation to describe this binding and find that it seems to be a reasonable description of the process. It appears that a period of several hours is needed for reaching equilibrium, but after that time the behavior appears slowly to follow the equilibrium isotherm. One consequence of this model is the apparent competition of endogenous dopamine for the binding sites in vivo. The data can only be fitted by the calculations when the endogenous dopamine is included as a competitive ligand. This competition presents the interesting possibility of measuring the synaptic dopamine concentration by its effect on the binding of neuroleptic drugs. A second observation in these studies was the increase of nonspecific binding of bromospiroperidol at very low drug loadings. This increase is attributed to the presence of binding sites that are ubiquitously dispersed and very dilute but of high affinity.

Journal

Annals of NeurologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1984

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off