Math–Gender Stereotypes in Elementary School Children

Math–Gender Stereotypes in Elementary School Children A total of 247 American children between 6 and 10 years of age (126 girls and 121 boys) completed Implicit Association Tests and explicit self‐report measures assessing the association of (a) me with male (gender identity), (b) male with math (math–gender stereotype), and (c) me with math (math self‐concept). Two findings emerged. First, as early as second grade, the children demonstrated the American cultural stereotype that math is for boys on both implicit and explicit measures. Second, elementary school boys identified with math more strongly than did girls on both implicit and self‐report measures. The findings suggest that the math–gender stereotype is acquired early and influences emerging math self‐concepts prior to ages at which there are actual differences in math achievement. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Child Development Wiley

Math–Gender Stereotypes in Elementary School Children

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2011 The Authors. Child Development © 2011 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.
ISSN
0009-3920
eISSN
1467-8624
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01529.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A total of 247 American children between 6 and 10 years of age (126 girls and 121 boys) completed Implicit Association Tests and explicit self‐report measures assessing the association of (a) me with male (gender identity), (b) male with math (math–gender stereotype), and (c) me with math (math self‐concept). Two findings emerged. First, as early as second grade, the children demonstrated the American cultural stereotype that math is for boys on both implicit and explicit measures. Second, elementary school boys identified with math more strongly than did girls on both implicit and self‐report measures. The findings suggest that the math–gender stereotype is acquired early and influences emerging math self‐concepts prior to ages at which there are actual differences in math achievement.

Journal

Child DevelopmentWiley

Published: May 1, 2011

References

  • Social categorization and the formation of intergroup attitudes in children
    Bigler, Bigler; Jones, Jones; Lobliner, Lobliner
  • Implicit theories of intelligence predict achievement across an adolescent transition: A longitudinal study and an intervention
    Blackwell, Blackwell; Trzesniewski, Trzesniewski; Dweck, Dweck
  • From American city to Japanese village: A cross‐cultural investigation of implicit race attitudes
    Dunham, Dunham; Baron, Baron; Banaji, Banaji
  • Implicit measures in social cognition research: Their meaning and use
    Fazio, Fazio; Olson, Olson
  • Talking about success: Implications for achievement motivation
    Heyman, Heyman
  • Categories influence predictions about individual consistency
    Rhodes, Rhodes; Gelman, Gelman

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