Mars pathfinder: New data and new model simulations

Mars pathfinder: New data and new model simulations The diurnal cycle in the temperature and wind speed of the Mars Pathfinder lander (MPF) is compared with the results from a one‐dimensional high‐solution boundary‐layer model. The radiation scheme of the model has been validated against line‐by‐line calculations in an average Martian case. The agreement with MPF observations is good. Strong daytime turbulent variability and steep vertical temperature gradients characterize the observations. A detailed look at the model physics reveals that the thin atmosphere responds strongly to thermal radiation. During the daytime, absorption of surface‐emitted thermal radiation by CO2, water vapour and dust is the main heating agent below 200 m despite the fact that the surface layer is strongly convective and dust absorbs solar radiation. The night‐time inversion is also transferred to the air mainly by long‐wave processes, although turbulent cooling dominates very near the surface (below 40 m). The near‐surface net heating/cooling displays a sensitive balance between several large and opposite physical processes, wherefore accurate algorithms and high resolution are needed for detailed model results. The modelled hydrologic cycle reveals a well‐mixed layer of up to 5 km with thin icy fog and frost forming in the night‐time. These sublimate back to the air soon after sunrise. Copyright © 2004 Royal Meteorological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Wiley

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/mars-pathfinder-new-data-and-new-model-simulations-VPPRVezzAA
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Royal Meteorological Society
ISSN
0035-9009
eISSN
1477-870X
D.O.I.
10.1256/qj.03.59
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The diurnal cycle in the temperature and wind speed of the Mars Pathfinder lander (MPF) is compared with the results from a one‐dimensional high‐solution boundary‐layer model. The radiation scheme of the model has been validated against line‐by‐line calculations in an average Martian case. The agreement with MPF observations is good. Strong daytime turbulent variability and steep vertical temperature gradients characterize the observations. A detailed look at the model physics reveals that the thin atmosphere responds strongly to thermal radiation. During the daytime, absorption of surface‐emitted thermal radiation by CO2, water vapour and dust is the main heating agent below 200 m despite the fact that the surface layer is strongly convective and dust absorbs solar radiation. The night‐time inversion is also transferred to the air mainly by long‐wave processes, although turbulent cooling dominates very near the surface (below 40 m). The near‐surface net heating/cooling displays a sensitive balance between several large and opposite physical processes, wherefore accurate algorithms and high resolution are needed for detailed model results. The modelled hydrologic cycle reveals a well‐mixed layer of up to 5 km with thin icy fog and frost forming in the night‐time. These sublimate back to the air soon after sunrise. Copyright © 2004 Royal Meteorological Society

Journal

The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological SocietyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2004

References

  • The Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System: model description and selected simulations
    Rafkin, Rafkin; Haberle, Haberle; Michaels, Michaels
  • Mars boundary‐layer modeling: Diurnal moisture cycle and soil properties at the Viking Lander 1 site
  • A model study of the atmospheric boundary layer in the Mars Pathfinder lander conditions
  • Modelling of the combined late‐winter ice cap edge and slope winds in Mars' Hellas and Argyre regions
    Siili, Siili; Murphy, Murphy; Haberle, Haberle; Savijärvi, Savijärvi

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off