Marine Pollution C. L. J. Frid | B. A. Caswell Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. 268 pp. ISBN 9780198726289, hardback, UK£75; ISBN 9780198726296, paperback, UK£34.99

Marine Pollution C. L. J. Frid | B. A. Caswell Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. 268... Wow, I was wondering what took so long! As a teacher of an introductory university course in marine pollution I have always relied on R.B. Clark's “Marine Pollution” and was a bit surprised that no new update came up after the 5th edition in 2001. The Preface sheds light on this situation, and this book might even be seen as standing in for that long‐awaited 6th edition – the authors’ close association with Clark, the dedication of the book to him, the same title, the same publisher, even the same size and thickness…That said, pollution “has come a long way, baby”, making the task ever more complex and daunting, and we can thank Frid and Caswell for taking the leap. To tackle this complexity the authors divide the book into eight major chapters: Introduction; Toxicology; Solved Problems?; Ongoing Issues; Emerging Problems; The State of the Seven Seas; Regulation, Monitoring and Management; and The Future Ocean. Each is necessary in its own right and represents a piece of the overall puzzle.The Introduction sets a nice framework with some necessary definitions, even if I personally wonder a bit about the GESAMP (Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection) definition of pollution (entirely anthropocentric bias …) and have never been all too enthusiastic about the distinction between “pollution” and “contamination”. This chapter introduces “Boxes” addressing particular aspects, players and cases studies. These Boxes continue to be used in other chapters as well and are a useful and modern touch.No book on marine pollution can do without a chapter of toxicology. Speaking of boxes, perhaps the additive, antagonistic and synergistic possibilities of contaminant mixtures would have deserved one of their own, considering that most marine systems no doubt simultaneously face dozens if not hundreds of pollutants, making synergism perhaps the key issue in marine pollution as a whole. The mention of Paracelsus (p. 28) and the fact that the dose determines whether something is a poison or a remedy is praiseworthy, but could have been nicely highlighted in the present, marine context by noting just how little salt is lethal to humans (a few tablespoons!).If one were to take issue with the structuring of the book, then it might be the chapter “Solved problems?”. (Heavy) metals, for example, are treated here, and the implication seems to be that, as we know about the problem so well, it is somehow “solved”. Oxygen‐consuming wastes (p. 46) and sewage treatment are also introduced here, immediately conjuring up eutrophication, which, however, is (thankfully) treated more fully in the next chapter under “Ongoing issues”: after all, eutrophication and the associated mass mortalities are the only form of pollution that can actually utterly destroy marine ecosystems (dead zones, p. 112) on a large scale. Of course, the “?” in the chapter title does allude to some hesitation regarding the “solved” moniker.There is a lot to like about this book. This ranges from the insightful chapter on what can be done about marine pollution (“Regulation, monitoring and management”) to the inspiring (even if somewhat frightening) “Future oceans” chapter. The concise “Synthesis” at the end of every chapter and the seven‐page glossary are valuable, as are the “Resources” and “Bibliography” after each chapter. How the authors successfully pared down the tens of thousands of scientific papers on marine pollution is beyond me. The index is extensive, although I was a bit shocked not to find the term “marine debris” in it (this hot topic is, however, treated extensively under “Plastics and litter”). Finally, the color photos are a good touch; for example, you can really only fully appreciate the amount of plastic in marine organisms by seeing the bright plastic items spilling from the exposed gut of a bird carcass (Plate 16).Outing yourself as a marine biologist almost invariably elicits a lament about the state of the world's oceans from those around you. This book provides the foundation for any more insightful response. It will inject a fresh breeze into my course on marine pollution. You definitely need this book on your desk‐side bookshelf too. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Marine Ecology Wiley

Marine Pollution C. L. J. Frid | B. A. Caswell Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. 268 pp. ISBN 9780198726289, hardback, UK£75; ISBN 9780198726296, paperback, UK£34.99

Free
1 page

Loading next page...
1 Page
 
/lp/wiley/marine-pollution-c-l-j-frid-b-a-caswell-oxford-oxford-university-press-05qUaa6PAL
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH
ISSN
0173-9565
eISSN
1439-0485
D.O.I.
10.1111/maec.12487
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Wow, I was wondering what took so long! As a teacher of an introductory university course in marine pollution I have always relied on R.B. Clark's “Marine Pollution” and was a bit surprised that no new update came up after the 5th edition in 2001. The Preface sheds light on this situation, and this book might even be seen as standing in for that long‐awaited 6th edition – the authors’ close association with Clark, the dedication of the book to him, the same title, the same publisher, even the same size and thickness…That said, pollution “has come a long way, baby”, making the task ever more complex and daunting, and we can thank Frid and Caswell for taking the leap. To tackle this complexity the authors divide the book into eight major chapters: Introduction; Toxicology; Solved Problems?; Ongoing Issues; Emerging Problems; The State of the Seven Seas; Regulation, Monitoring and Management; and The Future Ocean. Each is necessary in its own right and represents a piece of the overall puzzle.The Introduction sets a nice framework with some necessary definitions, even if I personally wonder a bit about the GESAMP (Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection) definition of pollution (entirely anthropocentric bias …) and have never been all too enthusiastic about the distinction between “pollution” and “contamination”. This chapter introduces “Boxes” addressing particular aspects, players and cases studies. These Boxes continue to be used in other chapters as well and are a useful and modern touch.No book on marine pollution can do without a chapter of toxicology. Speaking of boxes, perhaps the additive, antagonistic and synergistic possibilities of contaminant mixtures would have deserved one of their own, considering that most marine systems no doubt simultaneously face dozens if not hundreds of pollutants, making synergism perhaps the key issue in marine pollution as a whole. The mention of Paracelsus (p. 28) and the fact that the dose determines whether something is a poison or a remedy is praiseworthy, but could have been nicely highlighted in the present, marine context by noting just how little salt is lethal to humans (a few tablespoons!).If one were to take issue with the structuring of the book, then it might be the chapter “Solved problems?”. (Heavy) metals, for example, are treated here, and the implication seems to be that, as we know about the problem so well, it is somehow “solved”. Oxygen‐consuming wastes (p. 46) and sewage treatment are also introduced here, immediately conjuring up eutrophication, which, however, is (thankfully) treated more fully in the next chapter under “Ongoing issues”: after all, eutrophication and the associated mass mortalities are the only form of pollution that can actually utterly destroy marine ecosystems (dead zones, p. 112) on a large scale. Of course, the “?” in the chapter title does allude to some hesitation regarding the “solved” moniker.There is a lot to like about this book. This ranges from the insightful chapter on what can be done about marine pollution (“Regulation, monitoring and management”) to the inspiring (even if somewhat frightening) “Future oceans” chapter. The concise “Synthesis” at the end of every chapter and the seven‐page glossary are valuable, as are the “Resources” and “Bibliography” after each chapter. How the authors successfully pared down the tens of thousands of scientific papers on marine pollution is beyond me. The index is extensive, although I was a bit shocked not to find the term “marine debris” in it (this hot topic is, however, treated extensively under “Plastics and litter”). Finally, the color photos are a good touch; for example, you can really only fully appreciate the amount of plastic in marine organisms by seeing the bright plastic items spilling from the exposed gut of a bird carcass (Plate 16).Outing yourself as a marine biologist almost invariably elicits a lament about the state of the world's oceans from those around you. This book provides the foundation for any more insightful response. It will inject a fresh breeze into my course on marine pollution. You definitely need this book on your desk‐side bookshelf too.

Journal

Marine EcologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial