Marine centres of origin as evolutionary engines

Marine centres of origin as evolutionary engines The world ocean supports a dynamic system in which living organisms undergo constant movements. Although some would appear to be sedentary, all are capable of invading new territory at some stage in their life cycle. Underlying these comparatively rapid changes is a much slower evolutionary system whereby new species are formed and spread out. Depending on their place of origin and genetic resources, some of the new species may give rise to continuing phyletic lines. At the same pace, some older species approach extinction by continuing to lose territory. Over time, this evolutionary system appears to be no less dynamic than the contemporary one. In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to the East Indies as a centre of origin for the marine tropics. While other centres of origin in the Antarctic and the North Pacific have been recognized, little attention has been paid to their external influence. Yet in the cooler waters of the oceans, they are as important to those areas as the East Indies is for the tropics. Evidence indicates that evolutionary flows from all three centres contribute to a dynamic system that extends throughout the world ocean. Each of the three centres and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Biogeography Wiley

Marine centres of origin as evolutionary engines

Journal of Biogeography, Volume 30 (1) – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0305-0270
eISSN
1365-2699
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2699.2003.00810.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The world ocean supports a dynamic system in which living organisms undergo constant movements. Although some would appear to be sedentary, all are capable of invading new territory at some stage in their life cycle. Underlying these comparatively rapid changes is a much slower evolutionary system whereby new species are formed and spread out. Depending on their place of origin and genetic resources, some of the new species may give rise to continuing phyletic lines. At the same pace, some older species approach extinction by continuing to lose territory. Over time, this evolutionary system appears to be no less dynamic than the contemporary one. In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to the East Indies as a centre of origin for the marine tropics. While other centres of origin in the Antarctic and the North Pacific have been recognized, little attention has been paid to their external influence. Yet in the cooler waters of the oceans, they are as important to those areas as the East Indies is for the tropics. Evidence indicates that evolutionary flows from all three centres contribute to a dynamic system that extends throughout the world ocean. Each of the three centres and

Journal

Journal of BiogeographyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2003

References

  • Extinction and replacement in the Indo‐West Pacific Ocean
    Briggs, Briggs
  • Punctuation equilibrium excused: the original examples fail to support it
    Brown, Brown
  • Phylogenetics of Cancer crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura)
    Harrison, Harrison; Crespi, Crespi
  • Tertiary mammal evolution in the context of changing climates, vegetation and tectonic events
    Janis, Janis
  • Peculiarities of the geographical and vertical distribution of marine isopods and the problem of deep‐sea fauna origin
    Kussakin, Kussakin
  • Multiple trans‐Arctic passages in the red alga Phycodrys rubens – evidence from nuclear RDNA sequences
    Van Oppen, Van Oppen; Draisma, Draisma; Olsen, Olsen; Stam, Stam
  • Cryptic species of rockfishes ( Sebastes: Scorpaenidae ) in the Southern Hemisphere inferred from mitochondrial lineages
    Rocha‐Olivares, Rocha‐Olivares; Rosenblatt, Rosenblatt; Vetter, Vetter

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