Managing invisible employees: How to meet the telecommuting challenge

Managing invisible employees: How to meet the telecommuting challenge Managing Invisible Employees: How To Meet the Telecommuting Challenge Kathleen chrktensen Telecommuting, the substitution of the computer for the commute, has generated a great deal of interest in the business community over the last several years. Articles about employees who work away from centralized offices, typically in their homes, describe the diverse circumstances for telecommuters. Some of the images are exotic, such as the executive who lives in the Rockies, while working at her Chicago-based office; others more mundane, such as the manager who works at home two days a week and drives in the other three. However, the number of firms with formal telecommuting programs remains relatively small; in a 1989 study that I did for The Conference Board, only twenty-nine of 521 of the nation’s largest firms offered telecommuting.’ One of the reasons for this limited use of telecommuting is readily apparent. Telecommuters are invisible employees, working in corporate cultures that value visibility. When employees telecommute, they become “invisible” anywhere from one to five days a week. The fearful manager asks, “If I can’t see them, how do I know that they are working?” A flippant response could be, “How do you know they are working, even http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Employment Relations Today Wiley

Managing invisible employees: How to meet the telecommuting challenge

Employment Relations Today, Volume 19 (2) – Jan 1, 1992

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0745-7790
eISSN
1520-6459
DOI
10.1002/ert.3910190204
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Managing Invisible Employees: How To Meet the Telecommuting Challenge Kathleen chrktensen Telecommuting, the substitution of the computer for the commute, has generated a great deal of interest in the business community over the last several years. Articles about employees who work away from centralized offices, typically in their homes, describe the diverse circumstances for telecommuters. Some of the images are exotic, such as the executive who lives in the Rockies, while working at her Chicago-based office; others more mundane, such as the manager who works at home two days a week and drives in the other three. However, the number of firms with formal telecommuting programs remains relatively small; in a 1989 study that I did for The Conference Board, only twenty-nine of 521 of the nation’s largest firms offered telecommuting.’ One of the reasons for this limited use of telecommuting is readily apparent. Telecommuters are invisible employees, working in corporate cultures that value visibility. When employees telecommute, they become “invisible” anywhere from one to five days a week. The fearful manager asks, “If I can’t see them, how do I know that they are working?” A flippant response could be, “How do you know they are working, even

Journal

Employment Relations TodayWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1992

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