Major influence of a ‘smoke and mirrors’ effect caused by wave reflection on early diastolic coronary arterial wave intensity

Major influence of a ‘smoke and mirrors’ effect caused by wave reflection on early diastolic... IntroductionWave intensity analysis (WIA) has been used to study the upstream and downstream forces contributing to the distinctive pattern of coronary arterial blood flow (Sun et al. , ; Davies et al. ; Hadjiloizou et al. ; Smolich & Mynard, ), with ‘waves’ (i.e. incremental changes in blood pressure and velocity) arising from active forces such as myocardial contraction/relaxation or from wave reflection. Given the diastolic dominance of coronary arterial flow, there has been particular interest in the wave dynamics underlying the early‐diastolic flow surge and how waves around this time are affected by various forms of heart disease and medical intervention (Davies et al. , ; Kyriacou et al. ; Lockie et al. ; De Silva et al. ; Claridge et al. ). Three main waves have been consistently identified during this early‐diastolic phase of the cardiac cycle (Fig. ). [In this paper ‘early‐diastole’ refers to the period soon after the left ventricle starts to relax, and hence encompasses the short period before aortic valve closure, sometimes referred to as protodiastole.] A flow‐increasing backward decompression wave (BDWdia) is believed to arise from the release of extravascular compressive forces on intramyocardial vessels, producing a suction effect that propagates back towards the coronary ostium (Davies et al. ). In addition, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Physiology Wiley

Major influence of a ‘smoke and mirrors’ effect caused by wave reflection on early diastolic coronary arterial wave intensity

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Journal compilation © 2018 The Physiological Society
ISSN
0022-3751
eISSN
1469-7793
D.O.I.
10.1113/JP274710
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionWave intensity analysis (WIA) has been used to study the upstream and downstream forces contributing to the distinctive pattern of coronary arterial blood flow (Sun et al. , ; Davies et al. ; Hadjiloizou et al. ; Smolich & Mynard, ), with ‘waves’ (i.e. incremental changes in blood pressure and velocity) arising from active forces such as myocardial contraction/relaxation or from wave reflection. Given the diastolic dominance of coronary arterial flow, there has been particular interest in the wave dynamics underlying the early‐diastolic flow surge and how waves around this time are affected by various forms of heart disease and medical intervention (Davies et al. , ; Kyriacou et al. ; Lockie et al. ; De Silva et al. ; Claridge et al. ). Three main waves have been consistently identified during this early‐diastolic phase of the cardiac cycle (Fig. ). [In this paper ‘early‐diastole’ refers to the period soon after the left ventricle starts to relax, and hence encompasses the short period before aortic valve closure, sometimes referred to as protodiastole.] A flow‐increasing backward decompression wave (BDWdia) is believed to arise from the release of extravascular compressive forces on intramyocardial vessels, producing a suction effect that propagates back towards the coronary ostium (Davies et al. ). In addition,

Journal

The Journal of PhysiologyWiley

Published: Jan 15, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ;

References

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