Low maternal free thyroxine concentrations during early pregnancy are associated with impaired psychomotor development in infancy

Low maternal free thyroxine concentrations during early pregnancy are associated with impaired... BACKGROUND Maternal thyroid function during early pregnancy is an important determinant of early fetal brain development because the fetal thyroid is unable to produce any T4 before 12–14 weeks' gestation. Overt maternal hypothyroidism as seen in severe iodine‐deficient areas is associated with severely impaired neurological development of the offspring. At present, it is not known whether low free T4 (fT4) levels during pregnancy in healthy women from iodine sufficient areas may affect fetal neurodevelopment. METHODS Neurodevelopment was assessed at 10 months of age in a cohort of 220 healthy children, born after uncomplicated pregnancies and deliveries, using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development. Maternal TSH, fT4 and TPO antibody status were assessed at 12 and 32 weeks' gestation. Maternal gestational fT4 concentration was defined as an independent parameter for child development. RESULTS Children of women with fT4 levels below the 5th (<9.8 pmol/l, n = 11) and 10th (<10.4 pmol/l, n = 22) percentiles at 12 weeks' gestation had significantly lower scores on the Bayley Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI) scale at 10 months of age, compared to children of mothers with higher fT4 values (t test, mean difference: 14.1, 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.9–22 and 7.4, 95% CI: 1.1–13.9, respectively). At 32 weeks' gestation, no significant differences were found. In the group of women with the lowest 10th percentile fT4 concentrations at 12 weeks' gestation, a positive correlation was found between the mothers' fT4 concentration and children's PDI scores (linear regression, R: 0.46, P = 0.03). After correction for confounding variables, a fT4 concentration below the 10th percentile at 12 weeks' gestation was a significant risk factor for impaired psychomotor development (RR): 5.8, 95% CI: 1.3–12.6). CONCLUSIONS Low maternal plasma fT4 concentrations during early pregnancy may be an important risk factor for impaired infant development. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Endocrinology Wiley

Low maternal free thyroxine concentrations during early pregnancy are associated with impaired psychomotor development in infancy

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/low-maternal-free-thyroxine-concentrations-during-early-pregnancy-are-StNgs8mABL
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Blackwell Science Ltd, Oxford
ISSN
0300-0664
eISSN
1365-2265
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2265.1999.00639.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BACKGROUND Maternal thyroid function during early pregnancy is an important determinant of early fetal brain development because the fetal thyroid is unable to produce any T4 before 12–14 weeks' gestation. Overt maternal hypothyroidism as seen in severe iodine‐deficient areas is associated with severely impaired neurological development of the offspring. At present, it is not known whether low free T4 (fT4) levels during pregnancy in healthy women from iodine sufficient areas may affect fetal neurodevelopment. METHODS Neurodevelopment was assessed at 10 months of age in a cohort of 220 healthy children, born after uncomplicated pregnancies and deliveries, using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development. Maternal TSH, fT4 and TPO antibody status were assessed at 12 and 32 weeks' gestation. Maternal gestational fT4 concentration was defined as an independent parameter for child development. RESULTS Children of women with fT4 levels below the 5th (<9.8 pmol/l, n = 11) and 10th (<10.4 pmol/l, n = 22) percentiles at 12 weeks' gestation had significantly lower scores on the Bayley Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI) scale at 10 months of age, compared to children of mothers with higher fT4 values (t test, mean difference: 14.1, 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.9–22 and 7.4, 95% CI: 1.1–13.9, respectively). At 32 weeks' gestation, no significant differences were found. In the group of women with the lowest 10th percentile fT4 concentrations at 12 weeks' gestation, a positive correlation was found between the mothers' fT4 concentration and children's PDI scores (linear regression, R: 0.46, P = 0.03). After correction for confounding variables, a fT4 concentration below the 10th percentile at 12 weeks' gestation was a significant risk factor for impaired psychomotor development (RR): 5.8, 95% CI: 1.3–12.6). CONCLUSIONS Low maternal plasma fT4 concentrations during early pregnancy may be an important risk factor for impaired infant development.

Journal

Clinical EndocrinologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off