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Low‐fat diets, triglycerides and coronary heart disease risk

Low‐fat diets, triglycerides and coronary heart disease risk Summary Nutritionists are currently debating whether low‐fat high‐carbohydrate diets protect against coronary heart disease (CHD). Traditionally, low‐fat diets were prescribed because they reduce plasma and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations. However, there is considerable concern because low‐fat diets also increase plasma triglyceride (TG) and reduce high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations. Recent prospective epidemiological studies have shown that these are independent risk factors for future CHD risk. It has been proposed that the adverse effects of low‐fat, high‐carbohydrate diets on TG and HDL may counteract or negate the beneficial effect of reducing LDL cholesterol concentrations. Although there is also strong epidemiological evidence that reduced total fat intake is not protective against CHD, high‐fat diets predispose to obesity and insulin resistance, both of which adversely affect TG metabolism. This review presents the evidence in relation to the importance of TG as a risk factor for CHD, and explains the pathophysiology that may underlie the aetiological role of TG metabolism in the pathogenesis and progression of CHD. It also addresses the physiological consequences of advocating low‐fat high‐carbohydrate diets, with particular reference to the effects on lipoprotein metabolism and CHD risk. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nutrition Bulletin Wiley

Low‐fat diets, triglycerides and coronary heart disease risk

Nutrition Bulletin , Volume 25 (1) – Mar 1, 2000

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References (39)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2000 British Nutrition Foundation
ISSN
1471-9827
eISSN
1467-3010
DOI
10.1046/j.1467-3010.2000.00020.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary Nutritionists are currently debating whether low‐fat high‐carbohydrate diets protect against coronary heart disease (CHD). Traditionally, low‐fat diets were prescribed because they reduce plasma and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations. However, there is considerable concern because low‐fat diets also increase plasma triglyceride (TG) and reduce high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations. Recent prospective epidemiological studies have shown that these are independent risk factors for future CHD risk. It has been proposed that the adverse effects of low‐fat, high‐carbohydrate diets on TG and HDL may counteract or negate the beneficial effect of reducing LDL cholesterol concentrations. Although there is also strong epidemiological evidence that reduced total fat intake is not protective against CHD, high‐fat diets predispose to obesity and insulin resistance, both of which adversely affect TG metabolism. This review presents the evidence in relation to the importance of TG as a risk factor for CHD, and explains the pathophysiology that may underlie the aetiological role of TG metabolism in the pathogenesis and progression of CHD. It also addresses the physiological consequences of advocating low‐fat high‐carbohydrate diets, with particular reference to the effects on lipoprotein metabolism and CHD risk.

Journal

Nutrition BulletinWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2000

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