Loss of skills and onset patterns in neurodevelopmental disorders: Understanding the neurobiological mechanisms

Loss of skills and onset patterns in neurodevelopmental disorders: Understanding the... IntroductionOn February 19, 2016, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) hosted a workshop on “Loss of Skills and Onset Patterns in Neurodevelopmental Disorders: Understanding the Neurobiological Mechanisms”. Participants discussed the state of the science concerning understanding the variability in onset patterns, particularly the phenomenon of developmental regression, in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and related disorders. Consideration was given to model systems and cutting‐edge methods that may afford opportunities for a better understanding of the neurobiological pathways that deviate from typical developmental trajectories. Here, we summarize what is known about onset patterns in ASD, based on the discussion during the meeting, and consider the concept of critical periods for specific skills as a potential clue to underlying biology explaining different onset patterns. Research on Rett Syndrome, a rare genetic disorder that includes regression, is presented as a model for translational research. We then discuss tool development and methods that may ultimately be used for a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying onset patterns in neurodevelopmental disorders, leading to identification of biologically distinct subtypes and treatment targets.Loss of Skills and Patterns of Onset in ASDASD is a neurodevelopmental condition with highly diverse clinical expression, reflecting etiological heterogeneity [Geschwind & Levitt, ]. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Autism Research Wiley

Loss of skills and onset patterns in neurodevelopmental disorders: Understanding the neurobiological mechanisms

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1939-3792
eISSN
1939-3806
D.O.I.
10.1002/aur.1903
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionOn February 19, 2016, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) hosted a workshop on “Loss of Skills and Onset Patterns in Neurodevelopmental Disorders: Understanding the Neurobiological Mechanisms”. Participants discussed the state of the science concerning understanding the variability in onset patterns, particularly the phenomenon of developmental regression, in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and related disorders. Consideration was given to model systems and cutting‐edge methods that may afford opportunities for a better understanding of the neurobiological pathways that deviate from typical developmental trajectories. Here, we summarize what is known about onset patterns in ASD, based on the discussion during the meeting, and consider the concept of critical periods for specific skills as a potential clue to underlying biology explaining different onset patterns. Research on Rett Syndrome, a rare genetic disorder that includes regression, is presented as a model for translational research. We then discuss tool development and methods that may ultimately be used for a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying onset patterns in neurodevelopmental disorders, leading to identification of biologically distinct subtypes and treatment targets.Loss of Skills and Patterns of Onset in ASDASD is a neurodevelopmental condition with highly diverse clinical expression, reflecting etiological heterogeneity [Geschwind & Levitt, ].

Journal

Autism ResearchWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

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