Looking ahead: Future directions in, and future research into, second language acquisition

Looking ahead: Future directions in, and future research into, second language acquisition INTRODUCTIONThe theme of the commemorative issue in which this article appears is about looking ahead. I have been invited to address this theme by identifying future directions in, and future research into, second language acquisition (SLA). I happily tackle this assignment, but first I must give a nod to the past—to see from whence the discipline of SLA has come. As I tell my own students, it is important to understand ideas at the time they originated. Next, I identify some directions that I believe SLA theory and research are moving toward. Before concluding, I discuss the implications of SLA theory and research for language testing, research, and teaching.THE HISTORY OF THE FIELDA cognitive beginningAs far as the past in SLA is concerned, most scholars credit Corder () and Selinker () with publishing landmark articles that helped establish the modern‐day study of SLA. Corder's speculation that there existed a “built‐in” learner syllabus and Selinker's positing of an interlanguage (a language spoken by learners that is intermediate between their first language [L1] and the second language [L2]) ignited the imagination of many scholars, who were inspired, as Corder and Selinker had been, by Chomsky's () claim of the existence of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Foreign Language Annals Wiley

Looking ahead: Future directions in, and future research into, second language acquisition

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/looking-ahead-future-directions-in-and-future-research-into-second-2w0F4Sfl8R
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 by American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages
ISSN
0015-718X
eISSN
1944-9720
D.O.I.
10.1111/flan.12314
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONThe theme of the commemorative issue in which this article appears is about looking ahead. I have been invited to address this theme by identifying future directions in, and future research into, second language acquisition (SLA). I happily tackle this assignment, but first I must give a nod to the past—to see from whence the discipline of SLA has come. As I tell my own students, it is important to understand ideas at the time they originated. Next, I identify some directions that I believe SLA theory and research are moving toward. Before concluding, I discuss the implications of SLA theory and research for language testing, research, and teaching.THE HISTORY OF THE FIELDA cognitive beginningAs far as the past in SLA is concerned, most scholars credit Corder () and Selinker () with publishing landmark articles that helped establish the modern‐day study of SLA. Corder's speculation that there existed a “built‐in” learner syllabus and Selinker's positing of an interlanguage (a language spoken by learners that is intermediate between their first language [L1] and the second language [L2]) ignited the imagination of many scholars, who were inspired, as Corder and Selinker had been, by Chomsky's () claim of the existence of

Journal

Foreign Language AnnalsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off