Longing for the Good Life: Understanding Emigration from a High‐Income Country

Longing for the Good Life: Understanding Emigration from a High‐Income Country POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW 33(1): 37–65 (MARCH 2007) EMIGRATION FROM A HIGH-INCOME COUNTRY tion from industrialized countries has not been extensively examined, even though its consequences for these countries can be costly (see De Voretz and Iturralde 2001). Understanding what prompts people to leave their home countries or what motivates them to move to distant destinations is therefore of prime importance. This article examines the emigration intentions of the native-born inhabitants of a single industrialized country, the Netherlands. The reasons why immigrants, especially those from developing countries, move to the United States and Europe have been widely studied, and the driving force behind these migration flows is thought to be a higher living standard (cf. Hatton and Williamson 2005). The puzzle posed by the emigration of the native-born from industrialized countries is more complex, however. Why leave a country where the income level is high, public services are extensive, and the standard of living is the envy of immigrants from less developed countries?1 The economics of migration, initiated by Hicks (1932) and later developed by Sjaastad (1962) and Todaro (1969), sees migration flows as motivated primarily by differences in expected wages or skill prices. The “New Economics of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population and Development Review Wiley

Longing for the Good Life: Understanding Emigration from a High‐Income Country

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0098-7921
eISSN
1728-4457
DOI
10.1111/j.1728-4457.2007.00158.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW 33(1): 37–65 (MARCH 2007) EMIGRATION FROM A HIGH-INCOME COUNTRY tion from industrialized countries has not been extensively examined, even though its consequences for these countries can be costly (see De Voretz and Iturralde 2001). Understanding what prompts people to leave their home countries or what motivates them to move to distant destinations is therefore of prime importance. This article examines the emigration intentions of the native-born inhabitants of a single industrialized country, the Netherlands. The reasons why immigrants, especially those from developing countries, move to the United States and Europe have been widely studied, and the driving force behind these migration flows is thought to be a higher living standard (cf. Hatton and Williamson 2005). The puzzle posed by the emigration of the native-born from industrialized countries is more complex, however. Why leave a country where the income level is high, public services are extensive, and the standard of living is the envy of immigrants from less developed countries?1 The economics of migration, initiated by Hicks (1932) and later developed by Sjaastad (1962) and Todaro (1969), sees migration flows as motivated primarily by differences in expected wages or skill prices. The “New Economics of

Journal

Population and Development ReviewWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2007

References

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