Location, location, location: contextualizing organizational research *

Location, location, location: contextualizing organizational research * DENISE M. ROUSSEAU* AND YITZHAK FRIED H John Heinz III School of Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, U.S.A. Introduction `Location, location, location' (A realtor's advice to a would-be home buyer) Our goals in writing this editorial are to encourage more contextualization in organizational research and to signal that the Journal of Organizational Behavior gives a sympathetic reception to submissions incorporating context into their research methods and reporting. In this effort, we join with several articles in this issue of JOB: Chip Heath and Sim Sitkin's critique regarding what is organizational about organizational behavior; Alice Gaudine and Alan Sak's contextualized treatment of a hospital's absenteeism intervention; and Gary Johns's provocative commentary upon it. We offer some guidelines for writing scholarly articles that address context in a way that enhances our understanding of organizational behavior and the validity of our work. The term `context' comes from a Latin root meaning `to knit together' or `to make a connection.' Contextualizing entails linking observations to a set of relevant facts, events, or points of view that make possible research and theory that form part of a larger whole. Contextualization can occur in many stages of the reseach process, from question formulation, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Organizational Behavior Wiley

Location, location, location: contextualizing organizational research *

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
0894-3796
eISSN
1099-1379
DOI
10.1002/job.78
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DENISE M. ROUSSEAU* AND YITZHAK FRIED H John Heinz III School of Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, U.S.A. Introduction `Location, location, location' (A realtor's advice to a would-be home buyer) Our goals in writing this editorial are to encourage more contextualization in organizational research and to signal that the Journal of Organizational Behavior gives a sympathetic reception to submissions incorporating context into their research methods and reporting. In this effort, we join with several articles in this issue of JOB: Chip Heath and Sim Sitkin's critique regarding what is organizational about organizational behavior; Alice Gaudine and Alan Sak's contextualized treatment of a hospital's absenteeism intervention; and Gary Johns's provocative commentary upon it. We offer some guidelines for writing scholarly articles that address context in a way that enhances our understanding of organizational behavior and the validity of our work. The term `context' comes from a Latin root meaning `to knit together' or `to make a connection.' Contextualizing entails linking observations to a set of relevant facts, events, or points of view that make possible research and theory that form part of a larger whole. Contextualization can occur in many stages of the reseach process, from question formulation,

Journal

Journal of Organizational BehaviorWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2001

References

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