Location in Continuous Space *

Location in Continuous Space * The author gratefully acknowledges that this research w s supported by a grant from a the Control Data Corporation and by the McMaster Division of Arts. 1 This paper will henceforth call the new facilities “facilities” and any existing facilities or populations will be called “points,” or in a later model, “areas.” Dr. George 0. Wesolowsky is associate professor of management science in the faculty of business at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. Geographical Analysis essential facilities, discards the concept of cost minimization and aims to minimize the maximum weighted distance in the system. A HISTORICAL SKETCH^ The rather substantial literature treating location models with a continuous solution space was launched by Fermat in the 17th Century with the proposal: “Given three points in the plane, find a fourth point such that the sum of its distances to the three given points is a minimum.” The distances referred to are the Euclidean distances. This problem was apparently first solved by Toricelli in 1640; subsequent years produced many works that studied various aspects of the problem. The first generalization of the problem, one asking for the sum of weighted distances, appeared in Simpson’s “Doctrine and Application of Fluxions” (London, 1750). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geographical Analysis Wiley

Location in Continuous Space *

Geographical Analysis, Volume 5 (2) – Apr 1, 1973

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1973 The Ohio State University
ISSN
0016-7363
eISSN
1538-4632
DOI
10.1111/j.1538-4632.1973.tb01000.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The author gratefully acknowledges that this research w s supported by a grant from a the Control Data Corporation and by the McMaster Division of Arts. 1 This paper will henceforth call the new facilities “facilities” and any existing facilities or populations will be called “points,” or in a later model, “areas.” Dr. George 0. Wesolowsky is associate professor of management science in the faculty of business at McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. Geographical Analysis essential facilities, discards the concept of cost minimization and aims to minimize the maximum weighted distance in the system. A HISTORICAL SKETCH^ The rather substantial literature treating location models with a continuous solution space was launched by Fermat in the 17th Century with the proposal: “Given three points in the plane, find a fourth point such that the sum of its distances to the three given points is a minimum.” The distances referred to are the Euclidean distances. This problem was apparently first solved by Toricelli in 1640; subsequent years produced many works that studied various aspects of the problem. The first generalization of the problem, one asking for the sum of weighted distances, appeared in Simpson’s “Doctrine and Application of Fluxions” (London, 1750).

Journal

Geographical AnalysisWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1973

References

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