Local differentiation of cell wall matrix polysaccharides in sinuous pavement cells: its possible involvement in the flexibility of cell shape

Local differentiation of cell wall matrix polysaccharides in sinuous pavement cells: its possible... The distribution of homogalacturonans (HGAs) displaying different degrees of esterification as well as of callose was examined in cell walls of mature pavement cells in two angiosperm and two fern species. We investigated whether local cell wall matrix differentiation may enable pavement cells to respond to mechanical tension forces by transiently altering their shape. HGA epitopes, identified with 2F4, JIM5 and JIM7 antibodies, and callose were immunolocalised in hand‐made or semithin leaf sections. Callose was also stained with aniline blue. The structure of pavement cells was studied with light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In all species examined, pavement cells displayed wavy anticlinal cell walls, but the waviness pattern differed between angiosperms and ferns. The angiosperm pavement cells were tightly interconnected throughout their whole depth, while in ferns they were interconnected only close to the external periclinal cell wall and intercellular spaces were developed between them close to the mesophyll. Although the HGA epitopes examined were located along the whole cell wall surface, the 2F4‐ and JIM5‐ epitopes were especially localised at cell lobe tips. In fern pavement cells, the contact sites were impregnated with callose and JIM5‐HGA epitopes. When tension forces were applied on leaf regions, the pavement cells elongated along the stretching axis, due to a decrease in waviness of anticlinal cell walls. After removal of tension forces, the original cell shape was resumed. The presented data support that HGA epitopes make the anticlinal pavement cell walls flexible, in order to reversibly alter their shape. Furthermore, callose seems to offer stability to cell contacts between pavement cells, as already suggested in photosynthetic mesophyll cells. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Biology Wiley

Local differentiation of cell wall matrix polysaccharides in sinuous pavement cells: its possible involvement in the flexibility of cell shape

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 German Botanical Society and Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands
ISSN
1435-8603
eISSN
1438-8677
D.O.I.
10.1111/plb.12681
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The distribution of homogalacturonans (HGAs) displaying different degrees of esterification as well as of callose was examined in cell walls of mature pavement cells in two angiosperm and two fern species. We investigated whether local cell wall matrix differentiation may enable pavement cells to respond to mechanical tension forces by transiently altering their shape. HGA epitopes, identified with 2F4, JIM5 and JIM7 antibodies, and callose were immunolocalised in hand‐made or semithin leaf sections. Callose was also stained with aniline blue. The structure of pavement cells was studied with light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In all species examined, pavement cells displayed wavy anticlinal cell walls, but the waviness pattern differed between angiosperms and ferns. The angiosperm pavement cells were tightly interconnected throughout their whole depth, while in ferns they were interconnected only close to the external periclinal cell wall and intercellular spaces were developed between them close to the mesophyll. Although the HGA epitopes examined were located along the whole cell wall surface, the 2F4‐ and JIM5‐ epitopes were especially localised at cell lobe tips. In fern pavement cells, the contact sites were impregnated with callose and JIM5‐HGA epitopes. When tension forces were applied on leaf regions, the pavement cells elongated along the stretching axis, due to a decrease in waviness of anticlinal cell walls. After removal of tension forces, the original cell shape was resumed. The presented data support that HGA epitopes make the anticlinal pavement cell walls flexible, in order to reversibly alter their shape. Furthermore, callose seems to offer stability to cell contacts between pavement cells, as already suggested in photosynthetic mesophyll cells.

Journal

Plant BiologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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