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Linking Research to Policy to People's Lives

Linking Research to Policy to People's Lives As the senior editor of the Journal of Social Issues issue (Volume 56, Issue 4) on the impact of welfare reform, I have been asked to respond to the criticisms of the “aghast, saddened, and angry” Vicky Steinitz and Elliot Mishler. I share Steinitz and Mishler’s commitment to work for social justice. There are many ways to do that, and I prefer to try to work with others rather than publicly castigate those who have other strategies. I started my career in academia but found it frustratingly difficult to influence public policy when my primary work responsibility was teaching or conducting research. Since 1983, I have worked in the U.S. Congress, in the White House, and in public policy organizations. I have found it much easier to influence policy from the inside: For example, even as an inexperienced congressional staffer during the mid-1980s, when programs for the poor were being cut, I was able to write an amendment that made free lunches available to more low-income school children than ever before. Frankly, I’ve been hooked on Capitol Hill policymaking ever since. Despite the successes, policymaking can be frustrating. I have seen how policies can be developed based on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Analyses of Social Issues & Public Policy Wiley

Linking Research to Policy to People's Lives

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues
ISSN
1529-7489
eISSN
1530-2415
DOI
10.1111/1530-2415.00010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

As the senior editor of the Journal of Social Issues issue (Volume 56, Issue 4) on the impact of welfare reform, I have been asked to respond to the criticisms of the “aghast, saddened, and angry” Vicky Steinitz and Elliot Mishler. I share Steinitz and Mishler’s commitment to work for social justice. There are many ways to do that, and I prefer to try to work with others rather than publicly castigate those who have other strategies. I started my career in academia but found it frustratingly difficult to influence public policy when my primary work responsibility was teaching or conducting research. Since 1983, I have worked in the U.S. Congress, in the White House, and in public policy organizations. I have found it much easier to influence policy from the inside: For example, even as an inexperienced congressional staffer during the mid-1980s, when programs for the poor were being cut, I was able to write an amendment that made free lunches available to more low-income school children than ever before. Frankly, I’ve been hooked on Capitol Hill policymaking ever since. Despite the successes, policymaking can be frustrating. I have seen how policies can be developed based on

Journal

Analyses of Social Issues & Public PolicyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2001

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