Linking ecological scales and institutional frameworks for landscape rehabilitation

Linking ecological scales and institutional frameworks for landscape rehabilitation Managing landscape processes and conserving species often require actions across a broad geographic area, encompassing different management groups. This paper defines reason for: (i) mismatches between scales of processes and scales of management entities; (ii) lack of links between planning and rehabilitiation; and (iii)poor integration between groups. Solutions include enhanced roles for scientists and local government. Introduction T he wheat–sheep belt of New South Wales ( Fig. 1 ), and the agricultural lands of Australia generally, are greatly in need of rehabilitation. Dryland salinity, soil acidity and structural decline, declining water quality, pests and weeds, and loss of native biota are causing serious landscape degradation and conservation problems in these areas ( Saunders 1989 ; Goldney & Bowie 1990 ; Prober & Thiele 1993 ; Robinson & Traill 1996 ; Bennett & Ford 1997 ; Curtis & Lockwood 1998 ; Pratley & Robertson 1998 ; Williams 1998 ; PMSEIC 1999 ; Recher 1999 ; Reid 1999 ). Rehabilitation of these landscapes and their biota requires: planning and actions at scales at which landscapes and plants and animals function, mechanisms to link rehabilitation planning at regional scales with actions at local scales, and actions of different groups and organizations http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Management & Restoration Wiley

Linking ecological scales and institutional frameworks for landscape rehabilitation

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1442-7001
eISSN
1442-8903
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1442-8903.2001.00065.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Managing landscape processes and conserving species often require actions across a broad geographic area, encompassing different management groups. This paper defines reason for: (i) mismatches between scales of processes and scales of management entities; (ii) lack of links between planning and rehabilitiation; and (iii)poor integration between groups. Solutions include enhanced roles for scientists and local government. Introduction T he wheat–sheep belt of New South Wales ( Fig. 1 ), and the agricultural lands of Australia generally, are greatly in need of rehabilitation. Dryland salinity, soil acidity and structural decline, declining water quality, pests and weeds, and loss of native biota are causing serious landscape degradation and conservation problems in these areas ( Saunders 1989 ; Goldney & Bowie 1990 ; Prober & Thiele 1993 ; Robinson & Traill 1996 ; Bennett & Ford 1997 ; Curtis & Lockwood 1998 ; Pratley & Robertson 1998 ; Williams 1998 ; PMSEIC 1999 ; Recher 1999 ; Reid 1999 ). Rehabilitation of these landscapes and their biota requires: planning and actions at scales at which landscapes and plants and animals function, mechanisms to link rehabilitation planning at regional scales with actions at local scales, and actions of different groups and organizations

Journal

Ecological Management & RestorationWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2001

References

  • Catchment management for dryland salinity control: model analysis for the Liverpool Plains in New South Wales.
    Greiner, Greiner
  • Command and control and the pathology of natural resource management.
    Holling, Holling; Meffe, Meffe
  • Effects of long‐term vegetation management on remnant grassy forests and anthropogenic native grasslands in south‐eastern Australia.
    Lunt, Lunt

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