Limits to genetic rescue by outcross in pedigree dogs

Limits to genetic rescue by outcross in pedigree dogs Outcrossing should reduce inbreeding levels and associated negative effects in highly inbred populations. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of different outcrossing schemes using computer simulations. The inbreeding rate estimated for a 25‐year period of 2.1% per generation in a highly inbred dog breed reduced to 1.8% when a single litter was produced by an outcross without backcrosses. To reduce the inbreeding rate below 1%, more than eight of the 14 litters born yearly in the recipient breed had to be outcrossed. However, outcrossing in pedigree dogs is usually followed by backcrossing and generally involves one or a few litters. Backcrossing reduced the effect of outcrossing considerably. When two litters were produced by an outcross followed by one generation of backcross, the inbreeding rate was 2.0% per generation. Continuously outcrossing was more effective than a single or a few outcrosses. When each newborn litter during 25 years had a 5% chance of being produced by an outcross, the inbreeding rate reduced to −0.2%. To investigate the possibility that new alleles were introduced from the donor population into the recipient population, the fate of different type of alleles (varying from completely lethal to beneficial) before and after an outcross was investigated by first simulating 80 years of natural selection prior to the outcross and then different types of outcross. Because natural selection reduced the frequency of lethal alleles before outcrossing, the introduction of a lethal allele that was segregating in the donor breed but not in the recipient breed occurred rarely. Introduction of slightly detrimental alleles or neutral alleles occurred more frequently. In conclusion, outcrossing only had a limited short‐term effect unless repeated continuously. Nevertheless, it may help to buy time in which the population structure can be changed so that the effective population size increases. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Animal Breeding and Genetics Wiley

Limits to genetic rescue by outcross in pedigree dogs

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/limits-to-genetic-rescue-by-outcross-in-pedigree-dogs-KOUQZNdPfB
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH
ISSN
0931-2668
eISSN
1439-0388
DOI
10.1111/jbg.12330
pmid
29878495
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Outcrossing should reduce inbreeding levels and associated negative effects in highly inbred populations. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of different outcrossing schemes using computer simulations. The inbreeding rate estimated for a 25‐year period of 2.1% per generation in a highly inbred dog breed reduced to 1.8% when a single litter was produced by an outcross without backcrosses. To reduce the inbreeding rate below 1%, more than eight of the 14 litters born yearly in the recipient breed had to be outcrossed. However, outcrossing in pedigree dogs is usually followed by backcrossing and generally involves one or a few litters. Backcrossing reduced the effect of outcrossing considerably. When two litters were produced by an outcross followed by one generation of backcross, the inbreeding rate was 2.0% per generation. Continuously outcrossing was more effective than a single or a few outcrosses. When each newborn litter during 25 years had a 5% chance of being produced by an outcross, the inbreeding rate reduced to −0.2%. To investigate the possibility that new alleles were introduced from the donor population into the recipient population, the fate of different type of alleles (varying from completely lethal to beneficial) before and after an outcross was investigated by first simulating 80 years of natural selection prior to the outcross and then different types of outcross. Because natural selection reduced the frequency of lethal alleles before outcrossing, the introduction of a lethal allele that was segregating in the donor breed but not in the recipient breed occurred rarely. Introduction of slightly detrimental alleles or neutral alleles occurred more frequently. In conclusion, outcrossing only had a limited short‐term effect unless repeated continuously. Nevertheless, it may help to buy time in which the population structure can be changed so that the effective population size increases.

Journal

Journal of Animal Breeding and GeneticsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off