LETHALITY AND THE INDUCTION AND REPAIR OF DNA DAMAGE IN FAR, MID OR NEAR UV‐IRRADIATED HUMAN FIBROBLASTS: COMPARISON OF EFFECTS IN NORMAL, XERODERMA PIGMENTOSUM AND BLOOM'S SYNDROME CELLS

LETHALITY AND THE INDUCTION AND REPAIR OF DNA DAMAGE IN FAR, MID OR NEAR UV‐IRRADIATED HUMAN... Abstract Using normal human fibroblasts we have determined the ability of far (254 nm), mid (310 nm) or near (365 nm) UV radiation to: (i) induce pyrimidine dimers (detected as UV endonuclease sensitive sites) and DNA single‐strand breaks (detected in alkali); (ii) elicit excision repair, monitored as unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS); and (iii) reduce colony‐forming ability. Unscheduled DNA synthesis studies were also performed on dimer excision‐defective xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells, and the survival studies were extended to include XP and Bloom's syndrome (BS) strains. UV‐induced cell killing in normal, BS and XP cells was found to relate to an equivalent dimer load per genome after 254 or 310 nm exposure, whereas at 365 nm the lethal effects of non‐dimer damage appeared to predominate. Lethality could not be correlated with DNA strand breakage at any wavelength. The two XP strains examined showed the same relative UDS repair deficiency at the two shorter wavelengths in keeping with a predominant role for pyrimidine dimer repair in the expression of UDS. However, UDS was not detected in 365 nm UV‐irradiated normal and XP cells despite dimer induction; this effect was due to the inhibition of DNA repair functions since 365 nm UV‐irradiated normal cells showed reduced capacity to perform UDS subsequent to challenge with 254 nm UV radiation. In short, the near UV component of sunlight apparently induces biologically important non‐dimer damage in human cells and inhibits DNA repair processes, two actions which should be considered when assessing the deleterious actions of solar UV. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Photochemistry & Photobiology Wiley

LETHALITY AND THE INDUCTION AND REPAIR OF DNA DAMAGE IN FAR, MID OR NEAR UV‐IRRADIATED HUMAN FIBROBLASTS: COMPARISON OF EFFECTS IN NORMAL, XERODERMA PIGMENTOSUM AND BLOOM'S SYNDROME CELLS

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1982 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0031-8655
eISSN
1751-1097
DOI
10.1111/j.1751-1097.1982.tb04383.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Using normal human fibroblasts we have determined the ability of far (254 nm), mid (310 nm) or near (365 nm) UV radiation to: (i) induce pyrimidine dimers (detected as UV endonuclease sensitive sites) and DNA single‐strand breaks (detected in alkali); (ii) elicit excision repair, monitored as unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS); and (iii) reduce colony‐forming ability. Unscheduled DNA synthesis studies were also performed on dimer excision‐defective xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells, and the survival studies were extended to include XP and Bloom's syndrome (BS) strains. UV‐induced cell killing in normal, BS and XP cells was found to relate to an equivalent dimer load per genome after 254 or 310 nm exposure, whereas at 365 nm the lethal effects of non‐dimer damage appeared to predominate. Lethality could not be correlated with DNA strand breakage at any wavelength. The two XP strains examined showed the same relative UDS repair deficiency at the two shorter wavelengths in keeping with a predominant role for pyrimidine dimer repair in the expression of UDS. However, UDS was not detected in 365 nm UV‐irradiated normal and XP cells despite dimer induction; this effect was due to the inhibition of DNA repair functions since 365 nm UV‐irradiated normal cells showed reduced capacity to perform UDS subsequent to challenge with 254 nm UV radiation. In short, the near UV component of sunlight apparently induces biologically important non‐dimer damage in human cells and inhibits DNA repair processes, two actions which should be considered when assessing the deleterious actions of solar UV.

Journal

Photochemistry & PhotobiologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1982

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