Learning in interactive work situations: It takes two to tango; why not invite both partners to dance?

Learning in interactive work situations: It takes two to tango; why not invite both partners to... Learning that arises from interactions at work is the focus of this study. More specifically, the concrete activities of adult learners and their interaction partners were of interest because such learning activities largely determine the quality of learning outcomes. The results of the study are summarized in the form of a typology of interactive learning behaviors for adult learners (that is, workers) and their interaction partners at work. The similarities and differences among three occupational groups— teachers, financial service professionals, and police officers groups—were examined, and explanations were sought based on the nature of work and power. The results can help adult learners and their interaction partners enter into a more equal, dyadic, and reciprocal learning process and thereby contribute to a critical human resource development perspective. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Resource Development Quarterly Wiley

Learning in interactive work situations: It takes two to tango; why not invite both partners to dance?

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1044-8004
eISSN
1532-1096
DOI
10.1002/hrdq.1166
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Learning that arises from interactions at work is the focus of this study. More specifically, the concrete activities of adult learners and their interaction partners were of interest because such learning activities largely determine the quality of learning outcomes. The results of the study are summarized in the form of a typology of interactive learning behaviors for adult learners (that is, workers) and their interaction partners at work. The similarities and differences among three occupational groups— teachers, financial service professionals, and police officers groups—were examined, and explanations were sought based on the nature of work and power. The results can help adult learners and their interaction partners enter into a more equal, dyadic, and reciprocal learning process and thereby contribute to a critical human resource development perspective.

Journal

Human Resource Development QuarterlyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2006

References

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