LEARNING AND DEVELOPING FROM MANAGERIAL WORK EXPERIENCES

LEARNING AND DEVELOPING FROM MANAGERIAL WORK EXPERIENCES JULIA DAVIES N D M A R KEASTERBY-SMITH A Centre f o r the Study o Management Learning, University o Lancaster f f INTRODUCTION D U R I N G the last decade there has been an increasing interest in the way managers learn from normal work experiences. This has emerged from scepticism about whether formal management training ever gets used at all (Davies, 1973; Mant, 1969), and questions about whether, even if it is used, it produces the kind of behaviour which might lead to effective management, and hence business, performance (Hays and Abernathy, 1980; Livingston, 1971; Revans, 1981). Furthermore the potency of natural learning has been emphasized at a theoretical level by Kolb et a l . (1971), and at a practical level by a number of writers (Hague, 1979; Mumford, 1980, 1981). Above all, natural learning, and self-development with which it is associated, has the virtue of being relatively cheap to foster - provided this is done effectively (Burgoyne, 1977). The problem addressed in this paper is that of ensuring that managers do in fact learn and develop as much as they might from their normal work experiences. The bulk of the paper is based http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Management Studies Wiley

LEARNING AND DEVELOPING FROM MANAGERIAL WORK EXPERIENCES

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-2380
eISSN
1467-6486
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-6486.1984.tb00230.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JULIA DAVIES N D M A R KEASTERBY-SMITH A Centre f o r the Study o Management Learning, University o Lancaster f f INTRODUCTION D U R I N G the last decade there has been an increasing interest in the way managers learn from normal work experiences. This has emerged from scepticism about whether formal management training ever gets used at all (Davies, 1973; Mant, 1969), and questions about whether, even if it is used, it produces the kind of behaviour which might lead to effective management, and hence business, performance (Hays and Abernathy, 1980; Livingston, 1971; Revans, 1981). Furthermore the potency of natural learning has been emphasized at a theoretical level by Kolb et a l . (1971), and at a practical level by a number of writers (Hague, 1979; Mumford, 1980, 1981). Above all, natural learning, and self-development with which it is associated, has the virtue of being relatively cheap to foster - provided this is done effectively (Burgoyne, 1977). The problem addressed in this paper is that of ensuring that managers do in fact learn and develop as much as they might from their normal work experiences. The bulk of the paper is based

Journal

Journal of Management StudiesWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1984

References

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